Top Questions About Climbing Roses

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Questions About Climbing Roses

Asked by
lorinkleinman on
May 10, 2017
20722

Q. How to train climbing roses

Hi! I am trying to grow roses for the first time, and bought two, bare-root, from David Austin USA. One is a Claire Austin climbing rose, and when it arrived, it was smaller than any of the pictures I have seen of climbing roses.

How should I approach training it? It has some new growth: should I start tying longer pieces to the trellis, or should I let it get larger first? If so, how large? And should I eliminate the smaller of the new shoots?

I’ve been having trouble finding information about very young roses online, and would greatly appreciate your advice.

Sincerely,
Lorin Kleinman

Answered by
roseman on
May 14, 2017
A.

I believe in training climbing roses as soon as possible. Tie the canes off to your desired support structure early on as the canes become large enough to tie off well. Here is a link to an article on this subject for you: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/roses/training-climbing-rose-plants.htm

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Asked by
emptynest24 on
June 1, 2017
Meridian Idaho 83642

Q. climbing roses

6 years ago I planted 2 yellow climbing roses about 5-6 feet apart. They did great-grew full and with large beautiful blooms. Last year one of the climbers sprouted sub-standard RED roses. The other one is still sprouting the yellow blooms. Why would the color change on the one bush?

Answered by
chavez1961 on
June 4, 2017
A.

Most rose bushes are hybrids which can have many grafts from other plants. I have roses with 4 different colors. It makes a beautiful bouquet!

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Asked by
westshirley43 on
June 30, 2017
Cabot, Arkansas, some 7
Answered by
roseman on
July 2, 2017
A.

Moving a rosebush while it is actively growing can kill a rosebush. It is best to wait until they go dormant and then move the bush or bushes in the early spring before it starts to leaf out. I recommend watering your rosebush with some water that has both a product called Super Thrive and a root stimulator in it. Give the rosebush this same type mix the next 5 or 6 times it needs watering. The super thrive helps the rosebush deal with transplant shock and other stresses, the root stimulator helps get the root system to growing well. The leaves turning yellow are caused by stress shock and the fact that the root system is now not established enough to support all the growth. Thus the bush sheds leaves. Once the rosebush has recovered using the water mix mentioned above, sprinkle 1/2 cup of Epsom Salts around the rosebush, work in lightly and water in well.

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Asked by
rex.tara on
August 14, 2017
21222

Q. lack of blooms on climbing rose

A neighbor gave me a beautiful bright orange climbing rose. When it begins to bloom in Spring, it is covered with blooms. After that initial time, there are only a very few blooms at a time. What am I doing wrong? I live in Maryland (zone 7) and we have extremely humid summers. Is there a special plant food I should be using and how often? Thank you for any assistance you can lend.

Answered by
MichiganDot on
August 14, 2017
A.

Do you know the name of the rose? If yes, then search for that specific rose's care. Breeding for repeat blooming roses has had varying degrees of success. Regardless, repeat blooms will not match the flush of spring blooms. There are aspects of care that do make a difference in repeat bloomers. The plant needs full sun, at least 6 hours of direct sun daily; it should be fertilized several times during the growing season - the timing will depend on which fertilizer you use; and annual pruning stimulates more productive, younger canes. Check the website of the American Rose Society for detailed information.

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Asked by
Brodie on
August 24, 2017
Gillespie il. Zone 5/6

Q. Hybrid climbing tea rose

1st year planting hybrid tea rose. (1st attempt at roses) zone 5/6 very dry,hot and humid year. Plants have been watered every other day,fertilized twice a month via miriclegro rose formula. Outstanding foliage growth but not many buds nor blooms. What went wrong?

Answered by
MichiganDot on
August 24, 2017
A.

If the rose was planted this year, it may simply be focused on root growth at the expense of blooms. Feeding twice monthly seems excessive; too much nitrogen favors leaf growth over blooms. I'm not familiar with the product you mentioned but let's assume you followed the application instructions exactly. Does the plant get at least 6 hours of direct sunlight daily? Did you research your variety at sites like American Rose society and know that it is a re-blooming variety? The site will also help you learn how to prune this rose. Plant tags are too often not accurate or not what the average gardener will experience. With cooler weather, you may see bloom activity. A heat stressed plant may bloom less to conserve energy.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
July 19, 2018

Q. Care of climbing rose: new dawn

I have a new dawn climbing rose that I procrastinated managing this spring. I still have not done anything with it and it is the 19th of July. There are dead canes and thin, straggly canes. We have also had quite an over abundance of rain since spring. I was thinking of letting it be until late fall and then just cutting it all back. Any thoughts or suggestions? Thank you.

Answered by
MichiganDot on
July 20, 2018
A.

Feed the bush if you haven't already done so recently. More importantly, you must prune out dead (brown-black) wood. It is a source for disease and pest entry. Cut back as far as you need to in order to have canes where the center (pith) is white. Dead, diseased, damaged and dying canes should be removed asap regardless of the time of year. Make sure the rose is watered all the way through fall if rain is insufficient so that it goes into dormancy well-hydrated. Here is an article on how to prune climbing roses. https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/roses/pruning-climbing-roses.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
August 26, 2018

Q. Climbing Rose

My climbing rose is growing welll and looks very healthy but it just won\’t flower. Can you please suggest a solution? Thank you

Answered by
roseman on
September 6, 2018
A.

Some climbing rosebushes are once per season bloomers. So you only get one flush of blooms per growing season. Some climbing only bloom on that is called the Old Wood or the last years growth. Pruning can take the old wood growth back too far and thus eliminate the next growing seasons blooms or severely limit them. Another thing that can cause a lack of blooms is using fertilizers that are too high in nitrogen. Such fertilizers make them grow well with lots of foliage but either limit or eliminate the blooms production. Some bloom buster fertilizers are very high in nitrogen, thus will actually eliminate blooms if used too often but they do not specifically tell you that.

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