Top Questions About Roses

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Questions About Roses

Asked by
Anonymous on
November 2, 2010

Q. Tips for Transplanting a Rose Bush

I moved the first of the year and left my beautiful rose bush behind, The new family said I can come and get it. Well I live in Michigan and it gets pretty cold so I was wondering if I can dig it up now and hold on to it and plant it next spring after April?

Answered by
roseman on
November 2, 2010
A.

You certainly could plant the rosebush in a big pot and keep it in the garage for the winter. Keep an eye on the soils moisture over the winter so it does not dry out. You don't want to keep it wet, just moist. Also when planting it in the pot to overwinter it, place a couple tablespoons of Super Phosphate in the bottom soils. That will help keep the roots fed and healthy for the winter. Don't use triple super phosphate as that is a bit too hot for this use. Then plant the rosebush outside in the early spring once the ground gets to where it can be worked okay.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
November 2, 2010

Q. Rose Tree in a Container

How do I care for my rose tree that is in a container living in New England ??

Answered by
roseman on
November 2, 2010
A.

Where I live, here in Northern Colorado, tree roses are pretty much considered annuals as they do not survive the winters here. Part of that is because they are "built" rosebushes and are not natural or typically grafted rosebushes. Here is a link to an article I wrote on Tree Roses that may help you understand more about them: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/roses/learn-more-about-tree-roses.htm . Also contacting a local Rose Society and asking them how to care for tree roses in your area is a very good thing to do. Here is a link to the New England Rose Society website for you: http://www.rosepetals.org/ .

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Asked by
Anonymous on
November 21, 2010

Q. Flower Bed Width

Is 18 inches wide enough to plant roses?

Answered by
Nikki on
November 22, 2010
Certified Expert
A.

That would be a tight space for roses. You may be able to get away with it if you use a climbing rose on a trellis.

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Answered by
TX Master Gardner on
December 20, 2010
A.

Any of the knock out varities that are kept under control will work. Prune as required and although you may loose some blooms, knock out bloom contineously. Since you width is limited, be sure their soil depth is deeper than normal so that they may establish a good root system.

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Answered by
roseman on
November 22, 2010
A.

If you look at the growth habits of some miniature roses, the 8 inches might work. Look for short and compact growth habits. Some of them are nicely fragrant too. Again, do your homework on them for such limited room before you buy.

Stan

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Asked by
wheatley on
December 4, 2010

Q. Transplanting Climbing Rose

My fiancee brought the roots and stems of a climbing rose to Atlanta Ga. from Toulouse France. It is Fall and I was wondering how to care for this plant and help it survive the winter. Right now I have it in peat moss and potting soil.
Thank you and I hope you can help us. We plan a wedding in the summer and it will be in our garden and hopefully be blooming for the wedding.

Answered by
Heather on
December 5, 2010
Certified Expert
A.

In your area, I would recommend placing it outside for the winter. They need a bit of cold. Place it in a sheltered location, like next to the foundation of a house. Pile up mulch around the pot. Make sure it can get rain water where it is and if it can't, you will need to water it once a month.

You can plant it out in the spring. These article will help:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/roses/transplanting-roses.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/roses/how-to-transplant-roses-tips-for-transplanting-a-rose-bush.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
December 15, 2010

Q. Rose Leaves Yellowing

I have white roses on either side of garden, and the leaves of both have started yellowing. One stem at a time, all the leaves turn yellow. I use rose fertilizer, plus slow-release (been darn hot lately). One rose is 30 years old, the other is a cutting of it, and produces beautiful white flowers. I do not want to lose them.

Answered by
Nikki on
December 15, 2010
Certified Expert
Asked by
Jeannine on
December 29, 2010

Q. What Roses Are Good in Zone 3 to 4 (in Upper Michigan) With Loamy Soil?

What roses are good in Zone 3 to 4 in upper Michigan with loam soil? I have problems growing them, but love cabbage roses, no luck with them though. I do have two that have survived our winters, tons of snow. What do you suggest?

Answered by
roseman on
January 14, 2011
A.

Hello Jennine. I am in zone 5. However I believe any of the Dr. Griffith Buck roses would do just fine. Many of the floribunda roses or grandiflora roses seem to do better in colder climates than the hybrid tea roses. I love Distant Drums and she is a Buck rosebush. Check also with a local rose society to see what they recommend. You can locate one through the American Rose Society website at http://www.ars.org. Feel free to visit my website as well.

Stan the Roseman :o)

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Asked by
misty daniel on
January 29, 2011

Q. Are There Any Thornless Rosebushes That Bloom Year Round?

Please recommend some thornless rose bushes that bloom all year.

Answered by
MGKimB on
May 22, 2018
A.

I have 3 Zephirine Drouhin climbing roses that are a beautiful double pink (they look like a Hybrid Tea Rose) and they bloom the most in spring and rebloom throughout the summer and fall. They are thornless and they do not mind a little shade. I have them on the Northeast side of my house on an arched arbor and East side of my house on a fan trellis. I am in zone 6.

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Answered by
roseman on
May 20, 2018
A.

One that is nearly thornless and has wonderful fragrance and beautiful blooms would be one named Therese Bugnet.

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Answered by
CaptainAng on
February 11, 2011
A.

Hi Misty~
Good question you have here!
As far as long time bloomers go, Knock Out roses get my vote...and they're low maintenance as well as the most disease-proof.
Now the thornless part. I had to dig out my rose books and here's what I found~
The David Austin English rose is nearly thornless and a great rebloomer. The David Austin's Mortimer Sackler is another lovely, taller, nearly thornless rose.
Sunny Delight and Blue Girl have very few (if any) and they're constantly blooming.
'Nur Mahal' is a completely thornless Hybrid Musk rose, beautiful and fragrant.
'Reine des Violettes' (can be bought from The Antique Rose Emporium ) are 100% thornless and each year it blooms more and better blooms.

I'm sure there are more out there but these are all I could find. Good luck...I'm sure everything will come out 'smelling like a rose'! :)

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