Climbing Roses

Click on links below to jump to that question.

  1. Painting Trellis And Fencing
  2. Yellow Leaves
  3. Climbing Roses
  4. Climbing Roses
  5. area for climbing roses
  6. Planting Rose Climbers
  7. Wonky Rose Plant
Asked by Anonymous on June 19, 2011
Painting Trellis and Fencing

My extensive trellis and fencing need painting and I was wondering if the paint will affect the climbing flowers. When would be the best time to do this? [i. e. does it matter if the flowers are in bloom (roses, honeysuckle, wisteria)?]

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Your best bet is to carefully pull the plant from the trellis, taking care not to damage it, and then apply your paint. Do not reattach climbing plant until paint is completely dry. Alternatively, you could choose to wait until the plant is dormant, painting the trellis during this time.

Was this answer useful?
00

roseman

It is best to paint trellises in the early spring before any growth has started or on a warm winter day when there is no current growth. The overspray from spray paints can clog leaf pores and cause big problems. If applying brush on paint, it is hard not to drip paint upon the foliage which can also cause big problems to the foliage. Depending on the paint used, the fumes could cause burning of the foliage if done during growing times.

Was this answer useful?
00
Asked by Anonymous on January 2, 2014
Yellow Leaves

My David Austin ‘Blush Noisette’ climber, which I planted last year, has bloomed prolifically all year. It has looked particularly healthy until a couple of weeks ago when yellow leaves appeared on one complete central stem. It is planted on a southwest facing wall near the house where it is exposed to quite varied temperatures, from very cold in winter to very hot in summer! My soil tends to be clay but has been mulched often with horse manure and bone meal. Can you give me an indication as to what is wrong and how I can prevent it losing its leaves or worse…dying? Many thanks.

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

This could be caused by any number of things. This article may help narrow it down: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/plant-leaves-turn-yellow.htm

Was this answer useful?
00
Asked by Anonymous on March 25, 2014
Climbing Roses

Can I shape a climbing rose into a nice round bush?

ANSWERS
roseman

You can with some of them. Others just will not stay in the roundish shape and will send new growth out beyond the bounds you would like frequently. I have done it with a climber called Altissimo, beautiful big red blooms. It is a matter of wills sometimes I must admit! If you keep after it and keep the bush trimmed back, it may hold fairly well. With some climbers this will also cause a lack of blooms. With some of the older climbers you may well lose all the blooms as they bloom on the "old wood" or the last years growth. So pruning them back a lot will sacrifice blooms.

Was this answer useful?
00
Asked by Anonymous on March 28, 2014
Climbing Roses

Why is my climbing rose bare at the bottom?

ANSWERS
roseman

As some climbing rosebushes get older and taller, they tend to drop all the foliage at the bottom. This is what we call a bush being "leggy". Many folks plant some nice companion perennial flowering plants at the base of climbing roses and some taller hybrid tea and grandiflora rosebushes. That way we have colorful bloom smiles at the base and up around the top as well. The canes of these climbers act more like supply highways to the upper part of the bush and thus do not want to rob any of those nutrients getting to the upper parts. Kind of a neat action of nature really.

Was this answer useful?
00
Asked by jens on June 18, 2014
Area for Climbing Roses

We planted climbing roses, but now they’re overtaken by grass. So we put Roundup on the grass and are putting a border around the roses. I want to put some compost in the areas between the roses, to help with the hard soil, then cover the whole area and roses with potting soil, then put weed barrier down, covered by cedar bark. Does that sound right?

ANSWERS
roseman

It sounds like a good plan. I would be very careful with the Round Up though, a little drift of spray will cause problems with the climbing roses. For the grass and such that are closer to the bushes, try mixing some Round Up in a can and brush it on lightly with a paintbrush. There is a soils amendment out there called Clay Buster that works very well to help break up clayey soils, I know because I deal with it too!! Also I prefer either a shredded wood mulch (natural cedar or brown colored) or 3/4 to 1 1/2 inch gravel. The bark likes to harbor some of the bad guy insects and I have had worse problems with bad molds and funguses using the bark.

Was this answer useful?
00
Asked by sheila51 on October 3, 2014
Planting Rose Climbers

We are clearing a large area in our garden of some serious weeds, most of which we are digging up, but as we expect not to be able to get everything up, we want to use a strong weed killer as well. How long after applying the weed killer can we safely plant our new rose climbers?

ANSWERS
roseman

After applying the weed killer, I would wait at least 3 to 4 months. Then when planting the new climbing rosebushes discard all of the dirt from the planting holes and use bagged amended garden soils to refill the holes around the climbing roses. I use one called EKO brand that is available at Home Depot and Lowe's stores here. I like the mix that comes in the bag with the yellow front panel on it as it has some alfalfa meal in with the soils mix and roses love that!

Here is a link to an article that you should fine useful : https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/roses/planting-rose-bushes.htm

and

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/roses/rambler-climbing-roses.htm

Was this answer useful?
00
Asked by sheila51 on October 19, 2014
Wonky Rose Plant

One of my new Rose Climbers is not totally vertical, the base/roots are lying horizontally – should I lay the base/roots horizontally so that the shoots are upright in the direction that I need them to grow? If I did not do it this way, would all the stems end up rambling over the ground instead?

ANSWERS
roseman

A climbing rose will typically seek the vertical direction. However I would plant this rosebush so that the root system lays as it is and the canes are vertical so that the new growth grows up the trellis or wall where you have it planted.

Was this answer useful?
00
1 2 3 4

Not finding what you're looking for?

Ask A Question