Top Questions About Tomato Plants

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Questions About Tomato Plants

Asked by
Anonymous on
November 6, 2010

Q. Tomato Plant Watering

I got some brown rings near the top of the stem of my tomatoes this year and I am not sure why. Too much water, not enough???

Answered by
Heather on
November 7, 2010
Certified Expert
A.

It may be caused by tomato spotted wilt virus. A ringed appearance of lesions is a common symptom of this disease. This article will help:
http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu/factsheets/Virus_SpottedWilt.htm

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Answered by
greenfieldseeds on
May 23, 2018
A.

Tomatoes plant needs plenty water to grow up,

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Answered by
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April 3, 2018
A.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
November 15, 2010

Q. Infected Tomato Plants

I planted two tomato plants in my vegetable garden about 2 months ago. They have been doing really well until recently when the bottom stem and leaves began turning yellow and a white substance is now evident on the dying parts. Is this a fungal disease or pests?

Answered by
Heather on
November 17, 2010
Certified Expert
A.

It does sound like a disease. It is likely a blight (there are several) as these tend to move from the bottom of the plant upwards.

 

There is not much you can do for the plant. While the fruit is safe to eat, it is recommended that you remove the infected plants and destroy them to prevent the disease from spreading. You will not be able to plant tomatoes or other nightshade plants there for at least 1 year, as the disease will survive in the soil that long and infect any nightshade plant that is grown there.

 

This article will help:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomato/tomato-diseases.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
November 20, 2010

Q. Yellow Tomato Leaves

I started a raised garden in south FL, and amongst many veggies I have 3 tomato plants in pots. One plant has about 6 tomatoes but started getting yellow leaves up from the bottom of the plant. On one or two stalks, even the small new leaves are popping out yellow. No pests are present. What are your thoughts?

Answered by
Heather on
November 20, 2010
Certified Expert
A.

For tomatoes in pots, it is either a watering issue or a fertilizer issue. Make sure that you are watering them daily and add some slow release fertilizer (such as Osmocote) so that they get continual feeding.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
November 23, 2010

Q. Tomato Pests

How does one prevent caterpillars, etc. from eating my tomato fruit?

Answered by
Nikki on
November 23, 2010
Certified Expert
Asked by
DarrellC on
December 6, 2010

Q. How Much to Water Tomatoes — In Gallons Per Hour

I’m doing drip irrigation. what size, space, and flow rate should be used for Tomatoes?

Answered by
Heather on
December 6, 2010
Certified Expert
A.

I would also add that you should check the manufacturer's website. They may have a drip irrigation calculator for their specific product that will help you figure out (without having to do the calculations) what setting are best for your system.

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Answered by
Heather on
December 6, 2010
Certified Expert
A.

There is no set answer for this as drip systems vary and there are many factors that can go into this.

But, I can tell you tomatoes need about 2-4" per week of water, including rain water and that it is better to water 1-2 times a week rather than every day and a slower flow is better than a faster flow.

To figure out what is best for your system, place one of the drips into a container and let it run until the container is two inches full. If the container is 10 inches square and it takes 10 minutes to fill to 2 inches, you know that you need 1 minute per square inch watered for 2 inches. For each tomato plant, you want to allow for about 144 square inches of space to water, so in this scenario you would need to water for a total of 144 minutes per week.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
December 30, 2010

Q. Tomato Plant Splitting

I am getting a problem of stem splitting on the tip of the plant. What is the reason and could I get remedies for this?

Answered by
Nikki on
December 30, 2010
Certified Expert
A.

It could be that very rich soil is causing the stems to grow too rapidly, which can cause splitting. If this is the case, the plant will recover and improve as time goes on.

The other possibility is the tomato has Pith Necrosis. This article can explain more about it and how to treat it:http://u.osu.edu/vegetablediseasefacts/tomato-diseases/tomato-pith-necrosis/

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Asked by
Anonymous on
January 15, 2011

Q. Tomato Plants

If I do not want my tomato plants to grow to a height of 4 feet (maximum), what can I do?

Answered by
BushDoctor on
September 5, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

You can plant determinate varieties, or even varieties such as the patio type Red Robin.

Or You could also use Plant growth regulators. Products like General Hydroponics Bush Load Decreases internodal length, but it can carry some toxicity if not given time to flush out of the plant's system. Sometimes up to 50 days, even.
You can also use something like New Millennium Nutrients Decision, which is not so toxic but can still shorten the overall stature of the plant.

The least toxic, and best method if you already have the plant established and can't get to these products... Is training the plants sideways. Make use of trellising and cutting the tops off of plants to force branching down the sides. As well as keeping it shorter, it can also improve the yield of the fruit. The trade off here is the time it takes for recovery after each cut. They can still attempt to bear fruit, but Won't really get going until they have had time to heal and settle. Hope this helps some.

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Answered by
Philipwonel on
May 18, 2017
A.

Plant determinate or dwarf tomatoes.

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Answered by
roll-tide on
January 16, 2011
A.

You should plant bush type tomatos that only grow to 2 or 3 ft. or you can prune the tops off when they reach the desired height.

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