Top Questions About Climbing Roses

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Questions About Climbing Roses

Asked by
Anonymous on
December 8, 2014

Q. badly wind damaged climbing roses

My metal arch was blow down by the fierce winds earlier this week and I don’t know whether to just cut back all of the growth or to just try to lift the very long stems/branches and build a new arch and attach them to that!? Any advice will be appreciated!

Answered by
roseman on
December 13, 2014
A.

If the canes were not badly broken during the event, you should be able to build a new arch and attach them to it. You will want to prop the old arch up in some way so as to get the rosebushes canes up from the ground, yet not in the way of building the new arch. I would recommend adding some thin cable tie-backs to the arch to help prevent the wind from doing this again. The cables can be spray painted so as to blend in with the surroundings. If the canes are badly broken, prune out the damage and water the rosebush with some water with a product called Super Thrive in the water. Do this 2 or three times. It helps the rosebush overcome the stress and shock. Since this product is not a fertilizer it will not cause unwanted out of season growth or overstress the bush at such a time.

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Asked by
ALewis on
April 19, 2015
oklahoma

Q. my magenta climbing roses did not produce last year

My magenta climbing roses did not produce last year and this year instead of roses I am getting white flowers. Is something wrong with them?

Answered by
roseman on
April 25, 2015
A.

It sounds like you climbing rosebush was/is what is know as a grafted rosebush. The top desired rosebush has died at some point and the healthy and hardy rootstock rosebush has taken over. I suggest that you prune it way down and dig it out. Then buy a climbing or other rosebush that you like the looks of and plant her there. The rosebush you loved does appear to be gone. However, if it is only a cane or two that are producing white blooms and you do still get some of your originally magenta blooms, prune out just the white blooming canes all the way down into the ground, as that is the root stock trying to take over or perhaps it is what is called a sport of the original rosebush. Here is a link to an article for you on grafted rosebushes: >> https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/roses/own-root-roses-grafted-roses.htm

Stan The Rose Man

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Asked by
kgood on
June 6, 2015
zone 4, SE Iowa

Q. new climbing rose

I have a new climbing rose. I planted it about a month ago. It was doing fine, but now it looks like something is eating the leaves.

Answered by
billy1 on
June 11, 2015
A.

It could be the leaf cutter bee, if it looks like little round discs been cut out,if you sit in your garden sometimes you can here them chomping away. they are harmless they do not make the leaves look very good but they do no harm, they are taking the leaf cuttings for there nest....

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Asked by
Anonymous on
July 16, 2015

Q. how to prune a climbing rose

How to prune a climbing rose?

Answered by
roseman on
July 18, 2015
A.

Pruning climbing roses can be a tough job. Early spring pruning, I wait for the rosebush to show me what is still alive and what is dead. Otherwise with the older climbing roses, you will sacrifice many blooms with a heavy pruning due to them blooming on the "old wood" or last seasons growth. Newer climbing rosebushes can be shape or training pruned as needed. Here is a link to an article on this subject for you also: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/roses/pruning-climbing-roses.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
August 11, 2015

Q. rambling rose

I have a jasmine grandiflora about 6 yrs old. I have been given a cutting of a very old rambling rose, have only space on a wall with the jasmine. Can I grow it with the jasmine or would it do best in a large tub on the only wall left, which is a west facing garage wall? No soil here, only concrete. The jasmine is on a house wall facing east and the house faces south. This wall is in sunlight from early am until about 2pm. It is always quite hot but sheltered from winds and frost.

Answered by
SheilaSB on
August 14, 2015
A.

You could try growing the rambling rose in a container as you mentioned, but be sure the container has good drainage and that you are giving the rose just enough water. Roses require calcium to bloom, so I would suggest you "water" the plant with two cups of milk made from powdered milk every two weeks. Then add just a bit of water so that the milk does not remain on the surface of the soil. For other watering, use water that does not contain softener salt.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
August 16, 2015

Q. Suckers on Climbing Roses

I am not sure if I have suckers or not. From what I have read, suckers grow up from the root base. I have new shoots that come out from the stems all over the climbing rose. But they do seem to be wider and harder than the rest of the rose and the new little leaves are a purplish red. Can you please help me? I do not want my rose to suffer any damage. Thank you.

Answered by
roseman on
August 22, 2015
A.

Sounds like a good and super healthy climber to me! She is sending out more cane shoots to spread out more and truly fill up her space. The only problem with such a rose is that she will need to be pruned back a bit so as not to overtake the area she is allowed. If you do not have any allowed room issues, then enjoy! Article link: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/roses/pruning-climbing-roses.htm

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/roses/rambler-climbing-roses.htm

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Asked by
cissler on
April 1, 2016
68025

Q. Rose

I received a grafted climbing rose in a generic group I purchased. I do not have a place for a climber. I have previously created my own root roses. If I do cuttings, will this still be a climber? Where does the climbing gene come from? Does the graft control that?

Answered by
roseman on
April 2, 2016
A.

Some climbing roses were bred or hybridized to do just that, so the climbing gene would be in them. Taking cuttings would likely still give you a climbing rose. Some rosebushes can be pruned back to keep them more as shrub roses, such as Altissimo or some of the David Austin English rosebushes. In grafting the upper part of the rosebush is what is sold and desired by the buyer. The lower part or root stock is a hardier root stock so that the upper part performs better. So the graft and above is the rose you likely want. Below the graft is the hardy root stock that the particular nursery used for its hardy root stock.

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