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Questions About Fig Tree

  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    November 22, 2010
    Certified Expert
    A.

    There can be a number of factors that inhibit fig fruiting. This article will help you: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/figs/fig-tree-is-producing-fruit.htm

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  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    November 23, 2010
    Certified Expert
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  • Answered by
    Tim Nollan on
    September 26, 2019
    A.

    This is useful information. You can also read the information from this source - https://scamfighter.net/review/edubirdie.com

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  • Answered by
    Heather on
    December 12, 2010
    Certified Expert
    A.

    It sounds like your tree has developed Fig Rust. This article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/figs/figs-disease-rust.htm

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  • Answered by
    denniskemp on
    April 27, 2019
    A.

    I do a solid watering once the top 3 inches are dry. It currently stands by a small window with south exposure, and lots of non direct light. Can't seem to figure it out.https://www.customessayswriter.co.uk/

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  • Answered by
    Heather on
    December 13, 2010
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Most fig trees need to be 2-4 years old before they can produce fruit. I would say that your Texas variety needs a few more years before it is mature enough. The one from your brother's home may have been older when you got it or it may have come from a cutting from more mature wood or it is simply a variety that has less time to full maturation.

    For the one that it not producing, I would give it another year or so. Just in case, I would give it a bit of bone meal. Figs are very susceptible to too much nitrogen, which can produce lots of foliage and little fruit. Bone meal will provide phosphorus, which helps boost fruit production.

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  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    December 20, 2010
    Certified Expert
    A.

    If the soil was very, very dry when you got the plants, the soil may be resisting taking up water. Fill your tub or a large bucket with water and place the plants in the water and let them sit for about an hour. This will force the over dry soil to once again take up water and should help with the leaves falling off.

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  • Answered by
    Heather on
    December 19, 2010
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Fig trees do fine being heavily pruned, so that is not a problem. Prune as you need to. It will likely encourage the plant to grow more like a shrub though, depending on how big it is already.

    Pruning it in the spring after new growth appears will help reduce the amount of fruit it produces. You can also call local food banks. Some have programs where extra fruits and vegetables can be donated. Some food banks will even come and collect the fruit from the tree for you.

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  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    January 6, 2011
    Certified Expert
    A.

    You should always wait for newly planted trees to establishe themselves before attempting to prune. Generally, this can take up to a year. During this time the tree is putting all of its energy into growing roots, which is imperative for healthy growth. If you try to prune before your fig is established, it will simply revert this energy to healing itself, rather than growing roots, making it more susceptible to pests and disease.

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