What's your question? Ask

Top Questions About Jasmine Plants

Click on links below to jump to that question.

Questions About Jasmine Plants

  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    October 5, 2012
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Summer jasmine is best pruned just after flowering, in late summer or early autumn. Winter jasmine should be pruned in spring, immediately after flowering. On both types you can cut back flowered stems to a strong sideshoot and thin out crowded, crossing or misplaced branches. You should also remove any weak or thin stems. Overgrown vines can be cut back to about 2 feet from the ground.

    Was this answer useful?
    00
Join Us - Sign up to get all the latest gardening tips!
  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    October 22, 2012
    Certified Expert
  • Answered by
    AnnsGreeneHaus on
    January 6, 2013
  • Answered by
    AnnsGreeneHaus on
    March 24, 2013
    A.

    Depending on the size of your arbor, you might want to purche another set and plant on both sides of the arbor. This way, they will meet at the top and your arbor will be evenly covered. Don't worry too much about trying to intertwine the stems, they will do this naturally. This article should help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/jasmine/growing-jasmine-plants.htm

    Was this answer useful?
    00
  • Answered by
    AnnsGreeneHaus on
    October 24, 2013
    A.

    The plant could be Carolina Jasmine. This fact sheet shows pictures: https://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/ornamentals/nativeshrubs/gelsemiumsemper.htm

    Was this answer useful?
    00
  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    January 6, 2014
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Summer jasmine is best pruned just after flowering, in late summer or early autumn. Winter jasmine should be pruned in spring, immediately after flowering. On both types you can cut back flowered stems to a strong sideshoot and thin out crowded, crossing or misplaced branches. You should also remove any weak or thin stems. Overgrown vines can be cut back to about 2 feet from the ground.

    Was this answer useful?
    00
  • Answered by
    Heather on
    January 17, 2014
    Certified Expert
    A.

    That is rather odd. I suspect that there is a combination of pruning and fertilizer that may be causing this.

    When you prune the plant, you are cutting away much of the type of growth the plant blooms on, and it takes about a year for it to regrow. Since you are pruning in the cooler months, it has to wait nearly a year to be able to rebloom - and thus the cycle is repeated. If you can, wait until the spring to prune or don't prune at all this year to get the plant back on its normal cycle.

    Second, if you are like most people, you probably cut back on your fertilizer in the cooler months. You may be using a fertilizer that is too heavy on the nitrogen. Too much nitrogen will result in a lush, fast growing plant that has few blooms. Then, when you cut back on your fertilizer, the plant is getting less nitrogen and is able to bloom again. If you are fertilizing, look for a fertilizer that is a little heavier in phosphorous than in nitrogen and that will help with blooming as well.

    Was this answer useful?
    00
1 2 3 4 5 43

Do you know a lot about gardening?
Become a GKH Gardening Expert

OK