Top Questions About Philodendron Plants

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Questions About Philodendron Plants

Asked by
GINATH on
July 11, 2012

Q. I have a beautiful philodendron that is more than 15 years old

I have taken several starts from it and it still thrives. Lately I’ve noticed the ends of the leaves are fraying. I only noticed this because it’s never happened before. I’ve also noticed small brown circles, like an insect’s been munching on it. As of late, my plant doesn’t seem to be doing too well. Please help.

Answered by
sjgranny on
July 11, 2012
A.

Also (thought of this after I answered)....repot the plant but before you do, wash all old soil off the roots. My friend had a spathephillum (Peace lily) that was barely growing. The problem was in the soil: the vermiculite had gathered at the roots, preventing the plant from growing. Once removed, washed and repotted, the 'spath' began growing and is now a very impressive specimen.

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Answered by
sjgranny on
July 11, 2012
A.

It sounds like your philondedron is exhausted. Try rooting cuttings in water and create a new plant. I know that sounds painful but sometimes it is just the only thing to do.

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Asked by
pappapenny on
August 19, 2012

Q. Brown philodendron leaves

The edges of the leaves on my philodendron are brown. Am I overwatering?

Answered by
Nikki on
August 20, 2012
Certified Expert
Answered by
theficuswrangler on
August 27, 2012
A.

Sorry, clicked the button before I was done. If, when you test the soil, it's all dry all the way down, then you know you're underwatering, and you need to either water more often, or water more.

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Answered by
theficuswrangler on
August 27, 2012
A.

Philodendron usually react to overwatering by getting brown on the tips of the leaves, the brown area gradually extending so that it starts to take up the sides of the leaf as well. Also, the new leaves get smaller and smaller. It's easy to tell if you are overwatering - feel the soil. Get a bamboo skewer such as that used for kebobs, and stick it into the pot all the way to the bottom. When you pull it up it should be almost dry, with just the tiniest bit of soil sticking to it. That's when you water again

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Asked by
tonyskng on
September 23, 2012

Q. my philodendon plant is dripping water from the leaves

The plant is sitting at a corner of the house with good natural lights, but it started to drop water from the leaves.

Answered by
Heather on
September 23, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

This is a sign that the plant is infested with pests - likely aphids or scale. The water is actually honeydew that is secreted by the pests.

Treat the plant with a pesticide and this should clear up the problem.

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Asked by
robert rolanti on
November 20, 2012

Q. Philodendron Not Thriving

I have a split leaf philodendron that produces small leaves that eventually die over and over. It has a very large root tuber that came off another plant which is doing very well. I can’t seem to get this one to thrive and grow. Any ideas?

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
December 4, 2012
A.

Most philodendrons will signal that their soil is too wet by producing smaller and smaller leaves. Determine the soil moisture by inserting a probe or spoon well down into the pot, pulling up some soil, and squeezing it between your fingers. It should feel almost completely dry, the smallest trace of moisture, before you water again. Of course, you also should consider where the roots are in the pot. If the plant has a very small root system, with lots of soil unoccupied by roots, you might want to repot to a smaller pot.

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Answered by
AnnsGreeneHaus on
November 20, 2012
A.

Are the plants in the same potting soil? A commercial peatlite mix that your local greeenhouse grows in is great for philodendron plants. Is the new plant in a pot that's too large, therefore getting too much moisture. Are the plants in the same location? Are they getting the same nutrition? Try to find the things different between the two, and you should find the problem.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
May 27, 2013

Q. Transplanting Split-Leaf Philodendron

I have eight large plants in my yard that I would like to give away. What do I need to do to prepare these for transplant? I’ve been told all the leaves must be removed. Being that they are 6′ (H) x 6′ (W), that seems to be the only practical way. Please advise.

Answered by
AnnsGreeneHaus on
May 28, 2013
A.

What kind of plants? What zone are you in? Once dug, how long will it be until they get a new home?d

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Asked by
peanuts on
August 11, 2013

Q. Why Are the Leaves on My Indoor Philodendron Turning Black?

Why are the leaves on my indoor philodendron turning black?

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
August 29, 2013
A.

Black leaves are usually caused by a fungus, either infecting the roots (most likely) or the leaves. How old is the plant? If you just got it, it should be returned to the store for a refund. How long have the leaves been black, and which ones (old or new, top or bottom) could help determine what the infecting agent is. Just repotted? Could have been a pathogen in the soil. And are the leaves actually black, or dark brown.
Whatever the case, unless it's a plant infected from the store, or infected soil,
the problem probably lies in the soil being too wet. Philodendron need to have the soil close to dry all the way to the bottom of the pot between waterings. Check out this video about testing soil moisture http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBBh0RPPqu0

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Answered by
AnnsGreeneHaus on
August 13, 2013
A.

How old is the plant?
How long have the leaves been turning black?
Are all the leaves black?
Have you just repotted the plant, or changed it's environment in any way?
How much light does the plant receive?

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Asked by
Raleigh310 on
December 6, 2013

Q. Brown spine like knobs on Philodendron

I have what seems to be a healthy Phildendron. I noticed today it has brown spine-like knobs growing down the length of the vines of the plant. Sort of like reptile with spines down its back. I’ve never noticed them before or on any large Philodendron I have seen in the past. Is this a disease or should they be there?

Answered by
Heather on
December 9, 2013
Certified Expert
A.

These are aerial roots. They are normal and natural. The plant would use these in the wild to attach to a tree and climb upwards.

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