Top Questions About Jackfruit Trees

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Questions About Jackfruit Trees

Asked by
Deepali More on
October 27, 2014

Q. How to grow Jack fruit plant when it becomes very dry?

I plant jackfruit plant in my home but, due to some reason, I can’t provide water for jackfruit plant so it’s become very dry now. I want your help to grow that plant again. The plant comes from seed and it’s 6 months old.

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
October 28, 2014
A.

Jack fruit is a plant that requires a lot of water, and if you can't provide that water, there's no alternative. Water is most basic to all plants, and plants that can't adapt to drought conditions simply won't grow where they don't get sufficient water. So, if you can't provide water, I would suggest that you look for other, more drought tolerant species, to grow. Here's more information on jack fruit: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/jackfruit-trees/growing-jackfruit-trees.htm
Also some information on drought tolerant plants: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/xeriscape/drought-tolerant-plants-for-nearly-any-landscape.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
December 7, 2014

Q. Jackfruit

I have a jackfruit tree in my backyard which is about 3 years old and ten feet tall. It started to bear fruits about 3 to 4 months ago but they either dry up or drop off. The latest one to fall off was about 5 inches long. Please advise. Thank you.

Answered by
Nikki on
December 8, 2014
Certified Expert
A.

There are a few things that could be causing this. First, jackfruit trees do have a tendency to drop their fruit the first year they produce, so this may be just normal. Second, if the soil is lacking potassium, they may drop their fruit. Have the soil tested for potassium deficiencies. Third is that it was not well pollinated or pollinated at all. Generally, these trees need two trees to pollinate well and they also pollinate better if they are hand pollinated.

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Asked by
aksinhahal on
December 13, 2015

Q. Jackfruit tree

Fruits coming on the Jackfruit tree is decreasing with passing year. Now only 3-4 fruits are seen whereas 4 years back about 40-50 fruits were coming yearly. What care is required to make to yield more fruits?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
December 14, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

The amount of fruit produced can be effected by watering.

Also the tree will decline in production as it ages.

Here is a link to refresh you on the care requirements.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/jackfruit-trees/growing-jackfruit-trees.htm

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Asked by
gavinmork on
February 13, 2016

Q. Jackfruit tree

My name is Gav and I live in Sydney in a suburb called Rozelle. Rozelle is only 5 minutes from the CBD of Sydney. We bought the house we currently live in 3 years ago. The house is in a suburban street with a small front yard. There is a big tree in the front yard and around February of the first year we moved in it started producing huge fruits. I did some research and found out it was jackfruit. We had 30 Jackfruits in that first year.

I am emailing to ask if I could ask you some questions about jackfruits. A lot of the jackfruits grow but the majority of them, when they are quite small, they start turning black and get a fur on them and fall off. I looked up on the internet what it might be and it seems to be called Rhizophus rot. I am wondering if you have ever heard of this and how you would treat it. I want to treat the fruit and look after it.

Looking forward to hearing from you.
Thank you.
Gav.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
February 14, 2016
Certified Expert
Asked by
jakub.hradecny on
March 11, 2016

Q. Jackfruit

I´ve been reading the article about jackfruits written by Amy Grant, and I was really surprised how she said that the plantation of jackfruit is impossible. I’ve had four plants in my house for a one year, and it looks like they are ok. I´m searching info about how to extrude them to make fruit, but there isn’t anything on the internet about how to grow them. Do you have any experiences with them?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
March 13, 2016
Certified Expert
Asked by
Anonymous on
September 1, 2016

Q. Jackfruit Plant

I have a jackfruit plant in my backyard, which was actually grown from jackfruit seed and previously it was planted inside a pot where the seed germinated into a plant. For almost 8 weeks, the plant’s growth is normal and the existing space is not sufficient for the plant to develop fully so we planned to shift the plant from pot to a large size polythene cover filled with red soil (porous). While shifting, unexpectedly some of its secondary roots get torn from the plant. Plant is now moved to the new soil and the growth has slowed down. How can I get my plant to its original status?

Answered by
Alisma on
September 1, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

With time, your plant should recover. Some damage and stress from transplanting is common. These articles discuss how to help plants cope:

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/learn-how-to-avoid-and-repair-transplant-shock-in-plants.htm

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/hpgen/repotting-stress-treatment.htm

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Asked by
shawndoe2000 on
October 23, 2016

Q. Jackfruit seedling leaves turning brown

I started my jackfruit plant from a seed. I planted in a pot, put on the balcony and everything was great. The plants grew to about 12 inches tall. I had to relocate and this is where everything started going downhill. The new location is located on the 5th floor of a complex and is extremely windy and salty all day and night. I continued to water the same but noticed the dirt gets dry on top despite the watering. Seems to be wet below the surface. It has only been a week and the leaves started to turn brown on the edges and some in the middle. See attached photo. Please help, how can I recover these? I just put out of direct wind which will mean less sunlight but not sure if that will be good enough.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
October 24, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Yes this could be stress from the location change, wind damage and most likely some results of burning of the leaves from the salt.

You can try to create a wind break for the plants to reduce the salt residue hitting the leaves and the plants.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/jackfruit-trees/growing-jackfruit-trees.htm

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