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Top Questions About Dogwood Trees

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Questions About Dogwood Trees

  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    November 17, 2010
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Typically, you should treat a plant in a pot as though it is one zone lower than the one you live in. Many dogwoods are hardy to zone 3 or 4, depending on the variety. As for watering, most trees, like dogwoods, are dormant during cold winters so they will need less water. Don't leave them dry for weeks at a time, but do not let them sit in wet soil, or the roots will rot.

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  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    January 18, 2011
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Based on the comment that they have healthy foliage, I suspect that they have too much nitrogen in the soil. This happens if they are planted too close to a lawn that is fertilized regularly. Have the soil tested and increase the amount of phosphorous the trees are getting. This article has more information: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/dogwood/dogwood-tree-not-flowering.htm

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  • Answered by
    Heather on
    February 4, 2011
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Red Twig dogwoods should be fine in zones 7 and 8. It does sound like it died from transplant shock. Newly planted trees should be given extra water for at least 6 months, if you plant them in the spring (which is the best time to plants them. This helps to encourage them to grow new roots and establish well in the new spot. These articles will help for the future:

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/learn-how-to-avoid-and-repair-transplant-shock-in-plants.htm
    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/tgen/watering-newly-planted-tree.htm

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  • Answered by
    eddie007 on
    January 29, 2018
    A.

    hello cortana is your free smart digital assistant. She can support you by giving you reminders

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  • Answered by
    mcmurry on
    February 4, 2011
    A.

    Thanks Heather.

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  • Answered by
    Heather on
    February 24, 2011
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Probably the one that is looking diseased. It is likely not sap but rather honeydew from insects attacking the plant. This is commonly mistaken for sap and pests will attack a diseased tree.

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  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    March 23, 2011
    Certified Expert
    A.

    They should be fine. If you are feeling nervous about it, it will not hurt to cover them with a sheet (not plastic), but really they should be fine without it.

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  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    March 31, 2011
    Certified Expert
    A.

    It is most likely sap and dogwoods tend to sap when they are stressed. What is causing it can be one of several things. It can be everything from the fact that the tree may be getting old (dogwoods typically only live 10-15 years) to a pest of some kind. I would check the tree carefully for pests, particularly in the junctions were branches meet. Also, make sure to give it some fertilizer, to help keep its health up.

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  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    April 1, 2011
    Certified Expert
    A.

    If you enjoy the flowers from the azaleas, you can wait until they are finished blooming. In my own yard, when a dogwood tree died, I simply planted a climbing vine at the base and it now serves as a trellis for the vine. You can remove it as well, without too many issues, though the grinding may disturb the azaleas around it (depending how close they are), but not so much that it will kill them.

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