Top Questions About Tomatillo Plants

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Questions About Tomatillo Plants

Asked by
Anonymous on
May 23, 2011

Q. Tomatillo Plants

The flowers on my tomatillo plants never set – they always fall off. They have full sun almost all day. I get lots of flowers but they always fall off. Specifically, what should I do?

Answered by
Nikki on
May 23, 2011
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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 24, 2011

Q. Problems With Growing Tomatillos

I’m growing two tomatillo plants in pots in a conservatory that gets lots of sun and warmth. They are big, healthy plants with lots of blooms. I’ve been hand-pollinating them on a friend’s suggestion. My problem is that once a bloom is finished, its stem turns yellow and it drops off. I can see a tiny potential tomatillo in it, so it’s starting to set fruit. Do you have any idea why they won’t complete fruiting? Is there anything I’m doing wrong? Any help would be really appreciated.

Answered by
Nikki on
June 25, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

The high humidity from the conservatory is probably making it difficult for them to pollinate well. How are you hand pollinating? Tomatoes and tomatilloes are pollinated in the same way, so this article will help:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomato/pollinate-tomatoes.htm

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Asked by
anlongoria on
July 6, 2011

Q. Why Do My Tomatillo Plants Flower, but Not Produce?

A tomatillo plant of mine was recently transplanted from a container to the ground and now sits in direct sunlight. It has many flowers and is spreading out and growing nicely, but I have yet to see an actual tomatillo on it. I saved it from a farm down the road (it sat in a potato patch and got yanked out), and when it was pulled, it had at least 8 good sized tomatillos with many other flowers. It looks happy but it just hasn’t produced and it’s been about two months. I don’t think it’s a pollination issue because this plant is standing beside two other tomato plants that are producing just fine. Thanks!

Answered by
Heather on
July 11, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Most varieties of tomatillo are not self pollinating. They need another tomatillo plant to pollinate them. You may have a variety that is like this. Here is more information:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomatillo/growing-tomatillo-plants.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
July 10, 2011

Q. Tomatillos

This is my first time trying to grow tomatillos. My first one that I had fell on the ground. It was firm on the inside, but the outer layer was completely dry (like the ones I see in stores). Will the outer layer continue to dry? Is it ok to eat?

Answered by
Nikki on
July 10, 2011
Certified Expert
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Answered by
jan_sangl on
July 10, 2011
A.

Hi! As long as the fruit is undamaged, I have used the ones that fall on the ground and they have been just fine. They can be a little messier cleanup though, as the surface of the fruit is so sticky.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
July 10, 2011

Q. How To Kill Tomatillo Plants

I have tons of tomatillo plants everywhere. How do I control them?

Answered by
jan_sangl on
July 10, 2011
A.

Mine also reseeded pretty prolifically. They pull up easily, and as long as you get them out before they have fruit/dropped, that's the end of them.

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Asked by
raider on
July 11, 2011

Q. Tomatillo plants

I have tomatillo plants. On one plant the husks are not covering the tomatillo.

Answered by
Heather on
July 18, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

This is ok. This happens sometimes and is not normally cause for concern.

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Asked by
kunfuzed79 on
July 13, 2011

Q. First Time Tomatillo Grower

I only planted one not knowing that I needed two. If I was to buy another plant this late in the season, would the mature plant begin to fruit? It has had blossoms for some time now. I didn’t know why it wasn’t getting fruit. PLEASE tell me if I buy another plant and get it in the ground that there is still enough time for me to get some later in the season!

Answered by
Heather on
July 16, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

There should be, particularly since you simply need the second plant for fertilizing the first. Try to find as large a plant as possible to plant as your second plant and provide it with plenty of water to help encourage it to grow quickly.

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