Top Questions About Snake Plants

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Questions About Snake Plants

Asked by
Cgreen1 on
May 12, 2016

Q. Snake plants

How to prune a snake plant?

Answered by
kh0001 on
May 13, 2016
A.

Snake plants really don't need that much attention, and cutting the leaves can actually damage them (and sometimes cause them to die), so you should really only prune if or when the tops of the leaves become brown and wither. I only cut mine just a tiny bit above where it turned brown, being careful to make a very clean cut so that you don't end up with any "strings." The leaf will heal up that edge on its own (as long as you're caring properly for the plant).
This article contains more information about caring for Snake Plants:

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/snake-plant/snake-plant-care.htm

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Asked by
cln on
July 15, 2016
New York City

Q. Plant identification

I recently got a houseplant that appears to be a type of snake plant, but I haven’t been able to match its particular markings. I’m attaching a photo. Thanks!

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
July 16, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

We did not receive an image.

Try again and we would love to help you!

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Asked by
Anonymous on
July 16, 2016

Q. Potting after rooting snake plant

I have used the water method to root cuttings from my snake plant. Now that they have roots, should I let the stalks dry out before I plant them in dirt, or pot them right away? I am worried about root rot. I have had the same snake plant for over 12 years and my son was “helping” me take care of it by watering it without my knowledge. I managed to save several stalks and root them in water. But know I don’t want to pot them wet and have the new roots rot.

Thank you for any advice.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
July 16, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Go ahead and pot them up right away into a small starter pot, approx a 5" pot would be a good size with a drainage hole.
Use a good quality potting mix.
I have listed a link with proper growing information.
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/snake-plant/snake-plant-care.htm

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Asked by
Bmilo2000 on
September 5, 2016

Q. Trimming a snake plant

Can I trim part of a stalk? Two of them are at least 12 inches taller than the rest of the plant.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
September 6, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Yes, you can trim those leaves and then even propagate new plants.
These articles have more information.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/snake-plant/snake-plant-propagation.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/snake-plant/snake-plant-care.htm

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Asked by
robinholly on
December 29, 2016
Zone 7

Q. Snake plants and too much moisture

I have had indoor snake plants for some years but recently have experienced them dying from overwatering. However, the confusion on my part is that I do not overwater them. They get watered only about once a month, but when I do, they quickly turn yellow and keel over. The only thing I did differently recently was to add medium sized gravel to the top of the containers as mulch, thinking it would keep the water away from the leaves. Is the gravel mulch keeping them too moist? Should I remove it? If so, would a different mulch work better or should they have no mulch?

Thanks!

Answered by
Alisma on
December 29, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Gravel mulch can increase the amount of water that remains in the soil, and it can indeed lead to overwatering. So can pretty much any type of mulch on houseplants.

It is possible to keep houseplants mulched, but they may need even less frequent watering than you expect. How quickly the water is used will also depend on the size of the pot compared with the size of the plant, the type of soil mix, and the amount of light the plant gets. You can always test the soil a couple inches down with your finger to check if it is really dry enough before watering.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
January 27, 2017

Q. Snake plant

How do I stop the stems, some 3 and 4 feet in length, from falling over? My plant is in a large and deep pot and the plant is about 30 years old. If I put it in a smaller pot, the weight of the stems will make it tip over.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
January 27, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

It sounds like you need to divide the plant. This is easily done by lifting the entire plant from it's pot and and gently pulling the plant into smaller root systems.
Here is a link with more care information.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/snake-plant/snake-plant-care.htm

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Asked by
Julie on
February 17, 2017
New Hampshire

Q. Snake Plant’s Curling Leaves

I have a snake plant, and I noticed recently that some of the leaves are curling and and buckling. I haven’t watered it in a couple weeks, and the soil is dry. I read it could be a thrips pest, but I can’t find photos of what that damage looks like. Maybe I’m underwatering? Since (I learned) it’s a type of succulent, is it showing me that it’s thirsty? I also just noticed that the tops of some of the leaves are cracking a bit, and the very top of the leaf on the left looks dead. Thank you!! Julie

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
February 19, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/snake-plant/snake-plant-care.htm

It's difficult to see the issues you describe in the image. Since you mention the soil is completely dry; it would be time to water the plant. Though it stores moisture in it's leaves, if it is drawing on that water, it could result in the issues you are describing. Water when the soil is dry.

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Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
February 18, 2017
Certified Expert
Answered by
jloosigian on
February 19, 2017
A.

Thanks for the links, Downtoearthdigs, but the leaves aren't drooping, and the other link doesn't show what damage from thrips looks like, so I'm no closer to knowing what's wrong.

Obviously I didn't assume so, but could the curling and buckling shown be normal for these plants? Thanks!!

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