Top Questions About Peace Lily Plants

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Questions About Peace Lily Plants

Asked by
Theresecreamer on
May 29, 2014

Q. I transplanted my peace lily and it is now very wilted

I transplanted my peace lily to a pot 2″ bigger than its original pot. I didn’t mess with the roots at all and it is now very wilted. I’m worried it isn’t going to survive the shock. Is there anything I can do to help it rejuvenate?

Answered by
Theresecreamer on
June 8, 2014
A.

Thank you so much for your help. My lily is doing great.

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Answered by
Theresecreamer on
May 30, 2014
A.

Thank you, I have replanted it again and will keep you posted on how it works.

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Answered by
theficuswrangler on
May 30, 2014
A.

If you didn't straighten out the roots when you lifted them from the old pot, they may not moving into the new soil. First, check out this article on repotting; https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/hpgen/learn-more-about-repotting-houseplants.htm
You should probably pot your peace lily again. Start by soaking the whole thing in a bucket or sink for 15 - 30 minutes, to thoroughly moisten the root ball. Let it drain and rehydrate for a day or two, then de-pot it, and straighten out the roots. If they are severely matted at the bottom, you can cut off the bottom inch or so of root mass. Then go ahead and repot again. When you water, make sure you pour the water into the center of the plant where the roots are, as well as around the outer part.

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Asked by
laura amos on
June 5, 2014

Q. peace lily leaves turning yellow

I have had a peace lily in my office for about a month now and the leaves are turning yellow. What am I doing wrong?

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
June 6, 2014
A.

There are several things that can make the peace lily leaves turn yellow -- letting the soil stay too damp damages the roots so they can't transport water, and the leaves will turn yellow; letting the soil stay too dry, thus not containing any water for the roots to transport, will turn the leaves yellow; too little light will cause leaves to turn yellow. To decide what the problem is, test the soil in the bottom of the pot with a long skewer or moisture meter. The soil should read (or feel) only slightly damp before you water again. When you water, water enough that you get 1/2" run off, and don't worry about dumping it out. If soil moisture seems okay, move the plant so it gets more light. If you can read easily in the place where you put the plant, there should be enough light for it.

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Asked by
rbaker1160 on
June 24, 2014

Q. I have a peace lily that has brown leaves and sap on the leaves

Can I remove the leaves that have turned black ? There is also something brown on the stems and sticky on the leaves.

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
June 25, 2014
A.

Yes, you can remove the black leaves. Cut the leaf stems off at the bottom, where they emerge from the rhizome, which is under the soil. The brown things on the stems are scale insects, and the sticky sap is called honeydew, and is produced by the scale. You can get rid of them by using the techniques in this article: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/scale-bug-how-to-control-plant-scale.htm

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Asked by
Cailynsmommy06 on
August 20, 2014

Q. Peace Lily browning tips

I wanted to know what to do when the tips of our leaves start to turn brown? The plant is a peace Lily. Should I trim them and, if so, how?

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
August 21, 2014
A.

First, how big are the brown tips, and how many? If there's only a few tiny (1/4" or less), that's just ordinary usage. If there are bigger tips (1/2" or more), and on most of the leaves, that's a sign that the soil is too wet, and the roots are in distress. You can easily trim the tips off - use scissors, and trim so that the natural shape of the leaf is preserved. However, if you don't allow the soil to dry more between waterings, you will eventually lose the plant. Test the soil in the bottom of the pot - it should be damp, but not too moist. (Of course, the other side of the coin is that you don't want the soil to get too dry. Some people routinely let peace lilies start to wilt before they water them, but I don't think that's a good practice either.)

The roots can talk to you through the leaf tips after you trim them off - if they're still too wet, the tips will come back, but if the soil has dried out enough, you won't see any more tips.

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Asked by
barbaragraves57 on
October 10, 2014

Q. my peace lily leaf turning brown

Why are they turning brown? I changed the soil. Is that why it turn brown?

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
October 10, 2014
A.

Peace lily leaves tend to turn brown when the soil is too wet, because the roots rot. When repotting, you need to use a free-draining mix; a cactus soil mixed 1/2 & 1/2 with perlite would be very good. You might want to go ahead and repot your peace lily in some new soil. Also, make sure it dries sufficiently between watering. Check the moisture well down into the pot, not just on the top. An electronic moisture meter would help. Here are a couple of articles that could help you: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/peace-lily/peace-lily-plants.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/disease/treating-root-rot-gardening-tips-for-housplants.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
November 1, 2014

Q. Peace Lily

The edge of the leaves look burned on my Peace Lily almost as soon as they unfold. What does it need?

Answered by
Nikki on
November 3, 2014
Certified Expert
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Answered by
theficuswrangler on
November 1, 2014
A.

Basically it needs less water. Allow the soil to get to the slightly damp stage before you water again, and I'm referring to the soil in the bottom of the pot, not just on the surface. On a moisture meter, the needle will show about 1/2 way between dry and moist: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/testing-moisture-in-plants.htm
The second thing you can do is give it more light.

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Asked by
kmiller6711 on
November 22, 2014

Q. Can I save an indoor plant that got frozen outside

I had a peace plant outside when an unexpected freeze hit the area. I would guess the plant was in the cold about 6 – 8 hours. The leaves are shriveled badly but the core of the plant does not look dead. What should I do to try to save it?

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
November 23, 2014
A.

Cut off the shriveled and damaged leaves, set it in a bright spot (out to the cold, obviously) and test the soil for moisture level near the bottom of the pot, making sure the soil does not stay too wet - it should be maintained at a 'slightly damp' stage. If the roots are viable, they will send up new leaves. https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/testing-moisture-in-plants.htm

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