Top Questions About Key Lime Trees

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Questions About Key Lime Trees

Asked by
Anonymous on
January 13, 2011

Q. Flower Bud Setting for Key Lime Fruit

I’m with the understanding that it takes a certain amount of water at a specific time to get an established key lime tree to set bud and bear fruit. Our tree is very eradic in providing us fruit. Am I on the right track? Also, what might be involved with nutrition? I would appreciate any help you might provide.

Answered by
Nikki on
January 13, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

There are several reasons a lime may not be producing for you. This article outlines many of those reasons and how to fix them: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/lime/reasons-and-fixes-for-lime-tree-not-producing-blossoms-or-fruit.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
February 22, 2011

Q. Key Lime Tree Death

I live in Orlando, Florida and my tree is about 15 feet tall. Therefore, when it gets cold, I can’t cover it any longer to protect it.

We’ve experienced some freezing weather in January and fear that my tree may not have survived because all the leaves have fallen. Is there anything I can do at this point?

Answered by
Nikki on
February 23, 2011
Certified Expert
Asked by
Anonymous on
March 28, 2011

Q. ISD Treatment for Key Lime Tree

I live in Estero, Florida, which is about 10 miles north of Naples on the west coast of Florida. A Key lime tree recently purchased has a tag that states its ‘ISD Treatment’ expires in Sept. Searches on the Internet for this ISD treatment have not revealed any info. Neither does the web site for the Lee County Extension Agent here in Florida.

What is ISD treatment? What protection does it provide for the tree?How often does it need to be applied and where can it be purchased?Also, please provide any additional info if there are any other recommended sprays needed to keep the tree healthy.


Answered by
Nikki on
March 28, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

ISD stands for Imidacloprid Soil Drench. It is a form of pesticide treatment that nurseries use to combat common pests. It is applied to the roots and stays in the plant's system for a certain amount of time, thus the expiration date.

It is not something that is widely available on a retail level, though you may find it in some specialty shops. A nice organic alternative that is widely available is neem oil. This article will tell you more about neem oil:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/pesticides/neem-oil-uses.htm

Here is a university doc on Imidacloprid: http://www.umassgreeninfo.org/fact_sheets/plant_culture/imidacloprid.pdf

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Asked by
Anonymous on
April 13, 2011

Q. Key Limes

I live in Maui, Hawaii and have recently gotten small limes that are mostly juice (Key Limes?). I have retrieved the seeds but would like to know the best way to plant them. Do I rinse them and dry them out and then plant them in a planter? Everything grows in Hawaii, but is there a proper way to plant these lime seeds to get the best results?

Answered by
Nikki on
April 13, 2011
Certified Expert
Asked by
Anonymous on
August 11, 2011

Q. Key Lime Tree

I have a very healthy, tall, green Key lime tree that is going on 6 years old. In those six years I have not had one blossom or fruit. Do I need to have another tree or graft a limb from another tree to get fruit, or will it begin to grow fruit on its own?

Answered by
Nikki on
August 11, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

There is probably something environmental keeping it from blooming. This article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/lime/reasons-and-fixes-for-lime-tree-not-producing-blossoms-or-fruit.htm

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Asked by
monira on
August 19, 2011

Q. How Can I Protect My Key Lime Tree

I am planting a key lime tree in my backyard. How can I protect my tree from the frosty winter while it is outdoors? Do I have to cover it, and if so, with what? Thanks.

Answered by
Heather on
August 23, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

No matter how much protection you give your key lime tree, it cannot survive the winter outdoors where you live. You are best off putting it in a container and bringing it in for the winter each year. I live in a similar climate as you and I have an orange tree that I treat this way. I have had it for 13 years now and it has grown happily outside in the summer and inside as a house plant in the winter. Your key lime should be fine this way as well.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 30, 2012

Q. Few Flowers, No Fruit

Have a 4-year old lime tree. Do not have name of tree. Definitely not key lime. Any way, there were about 10 flowers, followed by ‘no’ fruit. We want fruit!

Answered by
Nikki on
July 1, 2012
Certified Expert
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