Top Questions About Houseplants

Click on links below to jump to that question.

Questions About Houseplants

Asked by
Anonymous on
January 26, 2011

Q. Spectrum Lighting for Plants

I have been told that I should use blue spectrum for vegetative growth and red for flowering. Is this true or is it always better to have more blue light?

Answered by
Nikki on
January 27, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Yes, this is true. It is best to have a balance in the spectrum, but a little more blue does help with having a healthy plant.

00
Was this answer useful?
Join Us - Sign up to get all the latest gardening tips!
Asked by
Anonymous on
February 12, 2011

Q. Aerate Soil

How do you aerate soil for houseplants?

Answered by
Nikki on
February 13, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

The best way would be to make sure that the soil does not get compacted in the first place. Always use a soilless potting mix when potting up house plants. But, if you do have a house plant that needs to be aerated, you can use a chopstick or wooden skewer and simply push them repeatedly into the soil to help open the soil around the roots up a bit.

00
Was this answer useful?

Answered by
CaptainAng on
February 12, 2011
A.

With proper maintenance of your plants, 'aeration of the soil' shouldn't be a task within itself.
Think of it as pound cake vs. angel food cake. If the soil is compacted, like a pound cake, the roots have a hard time spreading through out the container and can inhibit growth. Angel food cake has little of pockets of air that make it light and fluffy, so the roots can roam freely.
A natural means of aerating soil is earthworms. They crawl all around and make little tunnels so the plants root system can breathe.
Pre-packaged potting soil is composed of several ingredients, such as perlite, peat or vermiculite that will provide the plant with adequate drainage and proper aeration.
Every year, whether you repot a plant or not, your plants should be topped off with some organic material. A year's worth of watering will leach out most of the nutrients and pack down the soil.
I hope this explains your question...
We all could use a little lift or 'fluffing up' now and then, right? :)

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
Anonymous on
April 23, 2011

Q. Caring for Houseplants During Summer Outdoors

How should I take care of my houseplants during the summer when they are outdoors, and how should I prepare them to come back inside?

Answered by
Nikki on
April 24, 2011
Certified Expert
Asked by
Anonymous on
July 15, 2015

Q. Indoor potted plant

I have an indoor plant that says bright indirect lighting. Can I put it in sunny window in my sunroom?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
July 16, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

As long as the plant won't be in direct sunlight, that would be fine.

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
Kybutterflies50 on
July 30, 2015

Q. plant on front porch

I sit mine on our front porch every morning. It’s not in direct sunlight. Is this ok? All our windows are professionally tinted and, therefore, sun really does not come through our windows. I do bring the plant inside every night and put it back out every morning and it stays till it’s dark.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
August 1, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

What type of plant are you referring too?

Are you having issues with the plant?

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
Anonymous on
August 3, 2015

Q. jade and rubber plants

What is the best way to start a jade plant and a rubber plant? Just purchased a baby rubber plant and a baby jade plant and need tips on the best way to grow them.

Answered by
shelley on
August 3, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

Here are some articles that will give you information on the care and maintenance of your newly acquired plants:

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/jade-plant/jade-plant-care.htm

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/rubber-tree/how-to-care-for-a-rubber-tree-plant.htm

Happy gardening!

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
clbevilacqua on
September 9, 2015

Q. Growing plants indoors and in water only

After reading the article ‘Houseplants In Bottles: How To Grow Plants In Water,’ I have a couple of questions. I definitely fall into the plant watering challenged, so this seems the perfect solution for me! (I also hate the dirt!) My question is this: I don’t know anyone with plants that I can get cuttings from. Can I go buy several plants that are rooted in dirt and transfer them to water only? This is strictly for indoors and not to plant eventually in dirt. I want to keep them water bound permanently. Thanks for your help!

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
September 12, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

It is possible to wash the roots of smaller starter plants and place in water. The cost of small plants is fairly low so if they don't make the transition well, it would not be a big loss.
I would start with Philodendrons, Pothos, and Ivy's.

00
Was this answer useful?
1 2 3 5
Learn

Learn From
Your Peers on
Our Blog

Visit Our Blog
The website that started it all!
Main Website

Do you know a lot about gardening?
Become a GKH Gardening Expert

Learn More