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Top Questions About Ghost Pepper Plants

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Questions About Ghost Pepper Plants

  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    September 4, 2019
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Yes, they grow just fine under lighting. You will want at least 100 watts per plant, and you really want horticultural grade lighting.

    Unless you are willing to spend quite a bit of money on LED, these should not be looked at. The high end ones are the best lights on the market, but the cheap panels should be avoided at all costs, as it is a complete waste of money.

    Th best option that centers in compromise will be a ceramic metal halide fixture. They come in 315 watts and 630 watts (this is simply 2 315 watt bulbs) the smaller fixture will light a 4x4 area.

    With the proper lighting you can treat them as you did outdoors, feeding occasionally.

    On a side note, I have a pepper plant that is currently 3 years old under lighting, and several before that that have matched the length. They just get too unruly after several years.

    This article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/growing-hot-pepper-plants-inside.htm

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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    September 17, 2019
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Other than, general, chili care... Nothing more is necessary, unless you plan on bringing them in and under lighting for the winter.

    I'm glad to see that they are still thriving!

    Just make sure that you are letting them dry out a bit between each watering to avoid issues. They are well equipped to deal with the heat.

    This article will refresh you on general chili care: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/growing-chili-pepper-plants.htm

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  • Answered by
    GKH_Susan on
    September 28, 2019
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Were you able to provide the high humidity and sustained warm temperatures as required?
    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/growing-ghost-chili-peppers.htm

    Here are more tips to get hot peppers:
    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/chili-peppers-not-hot.htm

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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    July 20, 2020
    Certified Expert
    A.

    This appears to be a bacterial or fungal infection.

    There will, likely, be some issues with the leaves as well. A fungicide will be necessary to clear up the disease. The fruit will still be edible, but will be unsightly.

    Make sure the soil gets a chance to dry out very thoroughly, down to about 4 inches between watering. These plants are quite drought tolerant, but will not tolerate wet soils. Underwatering will be much preferred to overwatering.

    Here are some articles that will help:

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/info/using-fungicides-in-garden.htm

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/growing-ghost-chili-peppers.htm

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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    August 4, 2020
    Certified Expert
    A.

    They will survive, OK, in that close of proximity. Since they are in the process of bearing fruit, I would not move them. If you want to wait until after a harvest, then this could be appropriate.

    Keeping them in containers, and under lighting, is a good way to keep one or a few alive during that time. Even in container, they will get quite big and overproduce, so you may only want to keep one. They can be treated as Perennial in container, and in fact, can resemble a small tree after a few years.

    Between fruit sets, dig one up a good foot out from the stalk, shake off extra soil, trim excess roots if necessary, and place it into a container with plenty of soil below and above the root ball, and water in. It will grow in container quite well.

    Here are some articles that will help:

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/growing-ghost-chili-peppers.htm

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/growing-peppers-container.htm

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  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    August 11, 2020
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Because there is so much genetic variation among peppers, you should expect to see differences in appearance. It all does appear to be normal variation. Some more intense coloring can be achieved with environmental stresses, like a cool snap in the weather.

    Sometimes pruning stress can bring about changes in appearance.

    Most likely, these are from a previous crop that was allowed to open pollinate with something nearby. In this case, you can see quite a bit of variation among the fruit sets.

    Be sure that the soil has plenty of phosphorus and potassium to keep them producing their best.

    Here is an article to help you grow these peppers:

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/growing-ghost-chili-peppers.htm

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