Fruitless Mulberry Trees

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  1. Is My Fruitless Mulberry Tree Worth Saving?
  2. Dying Fruitless Mulberry
  3. Pruning/Bobbing Fruitless Mulberry
  4. Tilling Soil Around Fruitless Mulberry
  5. Fruitless Mulberry Pruning
  6. Fruitless Mulberry in Front Yard
  7. Fruitless Mulberry Tree
Asked by daqueen24 on May 26, 2013
Is My Fruitless Mulberry Tree Worth Saving?

I think the fruitless mulberry tree in my front yard might be dying. One half has leaves and the other half has nothing. I was wondering if I should try cutting the leafless side out. Would it grow back? Is the whole tree gone? I’m going to try to prune the entire tree, fertilize it and water it. I don’t want to do if it’s too late though. Please help me figure out what to do.

ANSWERS
Heather
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

It does sound like it is suffering and with that much damage, you have a tough choice.

You can try to treat it and it may come back, but it may take years before it fully recovers, if it can recover at all. Or you can replace it with a new tree, which will likely take years to real that tree's size.

If you want to treat it, you can try spraying it with neem oil. It is both a fungicide and a pesticide and is systemic, so will be absorbed by the parts of the tree that you can reach to spray and carry it to the parts you cannot. This will cover many of the problems that could be affecting it.

I would also recommend that you have an arborist come and look at it. Tree problems are very difficult to diagnose without directly examining the tree.

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Asked by kimeez on May 29, 2013
Dying Fruitless Mulberry

Last spring we noticed our 15 year old fruitless mulberry was slow to leaf out and looking sickly. spoke with someone that told us we may have injured it with weed killer and that to flush with lots of water as these trees are pretty hardy. This spring it blossomed late and now leaves are doing the same thing as last year. I don’t know if it will eventually die or do we wait it out. Seems as though the tree is putting up a fight. Help!

ANSWERS
AnnsGreeneHaus

Sounds like your tree is stressed. Has it been getting the equivalent or rain to 1'' a week? Have you been fertilizing, with what, according to package directions? Have you seen or seen signs of insects? If it's been adequately watered and fed with no insects, all you can do is wait it out. Your tree blooming is a sign that it's trying to survive. Just do all you can to help it. Is it in a container or planted in the ground? If containered, consider getting it into the ground...

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Asked by Anonymous on January 18, 2014
Pruning/Bobbing Fruitless Mulberry

What is the whole purpose for cutting/bobbing a Fruitless Mulberry tree? Does it allow the tree trunk to get bigger? Or, does it actually help maintain (somewhat) the size of the trunk from getting so massive? By doing that it actually puts tbe whole growing focus (the strength energy) on the tree’s branches and leaves. That would be my guess-timation anyway. I’d greatly appreciate some feedback.

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Pruning helps keep plants, including trees, not only healthier but more manageable in size. While all plants have different pruning times and requirements, this does aid in focusing energy to other parts of the tree, such as new leaf growth or even root development for those newly planted.

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Asked by Anonymous on March 6, 2014
Tilling Soil Around Fruitless Mulberry

I am considering tilling my lawn under the fruitless mulberry trees to reinvigorate the soil and bring my lawn back. The trees have a lively root system reaching out throughout the area. Would tilling destroy the roots and consequently the trees? Or will tilling merely cut some of the roots which might grow back? I am trying to figure out the best way to restore my lawn while keeping the trees healthy.

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

I would be a little skeptical about tilling so close to your tree. This will likely damage the roots and result in problems for the tree. If you are having issues with tree roots showing through the soil or the root are becoming invasive, the following articles may offer some help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/tgen/exposed-tree-roots.htm, https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/tgen/problem-tree-roots.htm

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Asked by Anonymous on March 23, 2014
Fruitless Mulberry Pruning

I have a fruitless mulberry plant that I pruned late in the winter, but there were several tall branches that I couldn’t reach (the branches alone are taller than my house). I now have an offer to help with the tree, but I don’t know if I should do so because the tree is growing new leaf buds. Is now a good time or should I wait?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

The best time to prune mulberries is in winter after the leaves have dropped. Remove broken or diseased branches any time of year. I would not recommend any pruning once the tree begins budding unless you just have to.

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Asked by Anonymous on April 19, 2014
Fruitless Mulberry in Front Yard

I just purchased a fruitless mulberry tree. Before I plant it, I’m worried about root problems because I had a previous old tree removed for complications with my pipes. Should I worry?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Normally, these trees' roots should not cause any problems unless the roots are already constricted by something else, like a foundation, or if the pipes already have a crack in them, it could cause problems.

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Asked by jimmarty on October 23, 2014
Fruitless Mulberry Tree

I have two trees that the bark is breaking off and the leaves have been falling off for several months. Do they have a disease?

ANSWERS
theficuswrangler

The breaking bark is possibly a symptom of a serious disease. https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/tgen/peeling-bark-on-trees.htm

The only way to know for sure is to have the bark analyzed by a licensed arborist, or by the county extension service. This link will help you find one:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/info/what-is-extension-service.htm

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