Top Questions About Elaeagnus Plants

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Questions About Elaeagnus Plants

Asked by
tcesni on
April 9, 2012

Q. large elaeagnus 15′ by 10′ some leaves yellowing then turning brown and curl

Many insects on plant, possiby scale and aphids. Will bark be infested too? Can I use it to grow honeysuckle on if leaves fall off?  Don’t wish to use chemicals, organic solution will not work. Tearing my hair out, please help.

Answered by
Heather on
April 16, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

I would recommend neem oil. It is organic and natural and is very effective at treating these pest. It gets in the planta nd makes the plant lethal to these kinds of plants.

Any pests that are attacking the elaeagnus can move on to plants planted nearby. It is best to treat it.

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Asked by
Kathierae on
April 9, 2014

Q. elaeagnus leaves are distorted

I just noticed that some leaves on my elaeagnus plants are distorted. Color is good but there are small brown areas on the bottom. I don’t see any evidence of bugs. Plants are two years old. Any ideas?

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
April 10, 2014
A.

Distorted and browned leaves are often a sign of small sucking insects, scale or aphids. Some of them are extremely difficult to see. The best thing for you to do would be to take some leaf samples to the local ExtensionService for analysis. This link will help you locate the closest one: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/extension-search/

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Asked by
johnst on
July 19, 2014

Q. Elaeagnus ebbingii rejuvenation

I am getting conflicting advice on this subject, so I thought I’d ask the experts. I have an old Eleagnus Ebbingii. It is about 3 meters (13 ft) tall. It is very bare & woody from the bottom half to 3/4 of its height. It has quite a lot of green foliage at the top ¼ of its height. I would like to try and rejuvenate it so that I get growth from the bottom & then I can hopefully keep it in shape. Some advice I’m getting says wait until spring when it starts to shoot. Other advice is – do it now. How and when would be the best time to do this drastic rejuvenation?

If possible, I’d like to do it now. If I did, what would be the likely result? I would appreciate it if you could give me some advice on the subject.

Thanks

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
July 20, 2014
A.

It's just the general practice to prune many evergreens, etc. in spring, when they've broken dormancy. However, you can prune it later if you want, just not so late that winter weather might damage new growth. You will also be cutting off your fall flowers, of course.

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Asked by
Maldener on
April 19, 2015
New Malden KT 36 AJ surrey

Q. My elaeagnus is dying after 20 years

Elaeagnus planted more than 20 years ago now has crinkled leaves and looks as if it’s dying. Is this normal or is it happening elsewhere? No sign of any new growth this year.

Answered by
shelley on
April 20, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

If you had a particularly harsh winter, your elaeagnus may have suffered a cold injury or, given that your bush is 20 years old, it could be old age and weariness. It could also be the work of an insect - the "vine weevil" is known to feast on elaeagnus shrubs.

For information on winter injury in shrubs and how to treat it, please visit the following link:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/shgen/winter-damage-of-shrubs.htm

For more information on weevils, go here:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/insects/controlling-root-weevil.htm

For information on how to care for elaeagnus plants, please visit the following link:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/elaeagnus/russian-olive-information.htm

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Asked by
Paulinehocknull on
November 5, 2016
Cannock

Q. Elaeagnus ebbingei

We have lots of 10 litre stock turned yellowish colour. Is this natural?

Answered by
Alisma on
November 6, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Elaeagnus varieties can be deciduous or evergreen depending on the climate. Perhaps the leaves are yellowing in preparation for winter (if you are in the northern hemisphere).

Here are some other general reasons a plant's leaves might turn yellow:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/plant-leaves-turn-yellow.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
May 18, 2017

Q. elaeagnus shrubs

I planted my 48 elaeagnus shrubs in February and several of them are dying. I have watered them and put miracle gro around them. What else can I do?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
May 18, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

It would be wonderful if every plant or tree we every planted was successful, but sometimes that is not the case.
Starting with well cared for nursery stock helps and then mother nature plays a very large part.

Light, sandy soil is preferred for this shrub. Well draining soil is very important. Watering new planting is very important in the first few weeks and then you can generally taper off.

Most reputable garden centers offer a guarantee or replacement of plants that perish in the first year of planting.

Here is a link to refresh you on the care requirements.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/elaeagnus/russian-olive-information.htm

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Asked by
Lyntebbutt on
September 30, 2017
ST10 1DT midlands

Q. Elaeagnus that dont flower- why?

I have three elaeagnus shrubs- 2 bought from same nursery and one from a different one. They are very healthy and grow rapidly but at 3 year years old none have flowered. From reputable sources I was told that they would? Do I need to feed them more or prune in anyway. All in pole positions where I really wanted them to flower

Answered by
BushDoctor on
September 30, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

First, it is important to know that you will never have to give these foods high in nitrogen. They fix their own. It could be, however, that they need a little phosphorus and potassium. Feed them a little bit of fertilizer high in these. Also, to give it the energy it needs to flower, you should cut back any new extra growth such as shoots coming out of the ground from the roots. This will ensure it has the energy it needs to grow flowers instead of shoots. Here is some more information on the plant:

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/elaeagnus/russian-olive-information.htm

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