Top Questions About Coral Bells

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Questions About Coral Bells

Asked by
Grammysuern on
June 4, 2016
Powell Ohio 43065

Q. Coral bells

I planted these coral bells about 3 yrs ago. I should have split them last fall, didn’t:). Now they have gone crazy with blooms. One of the plants has fallen over and is looking very bad. What should I do next? Thank you

Answered by
kh0001 on
June 5, 2016
A.

You should typically wait till fall to split them, but if it looks like you're about to lose one, you might as well try to transplant it to see if the extra room will help the sickly one. Or, you could leave them in the same spot, pay special attention to the water and light situation and wait till fall to divide them. This article may give you some tips on continuing care:

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/coral-bells/coral-bells-plant.htm

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Asked by
Johnson.theresa on
June 8, 2017
54661

Q. Transplanting coral bells

Ok to transplant Coral bells to full morning to noon sun?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
June 11, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

Although green-leafed coral bells can be grown in full sun, coral bells with red or purple foliage do best in partially to fully shaded areas of the garden. Coral bells grown in full shade are less likely to flower, so place the plants in dappled shade if you want to see the stalks of bell-shaped flowers each spring.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/coral-bells/coral-bells-plant.htm

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Asked by
chocobillie on
July 7, 2017
27817

Q. coral bells

Good Day, have planted coral bells in our front yard under a large crype myrtle tree and nothing much is happening one has bloomed a little but the other two haven’t shown any growth at all. They appear to be healthy with good color but no growth or enlargement from the original plantings.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
July 8, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

Coral Bells do well in a shady location with a loamy well draining soil.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/coral-bells/coral-bells-plant.htm

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Asked by
jlb55 on
October 26, 2017
6A

Q. protecting my coral bells in the winter

how do I protect my coral bell in the winter months. my flower bed has decorative rocks, so Do I have to push aside my decorative rocks from around the plant and add mulch or compost around the coral bells.

Answered by
BushDoctor on
October 27, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

Unfortunately, I need more information, such as your climate zone, age of the plants, etc. to give you the best advice on this. With the details provided I can only tell you what the plant can tolerate. It will be up to you to decide if your conditions fall within these acceptable ranges.

Here is an article on the care of the plant: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/coral-bells/coral-bells-plant.htm

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Asked by
jlb55 on
October 27, 2017
6A

Q. protecting my coral bells in the winter

I live in Southeast Michigan my zone is 6A. I planted coral bells this past summer and a few about a month ago. Is there anything special I can do so they will come back next spring/summer. Some people say just leave them alone and they will be fine but I am not sure. They are in my flower bed, I use decorative rocks instead of mulch. Carmel, Peach Crisp, Purple Palace, Autumn Leaves, Berry Smooth, Zipper, blackberry ice,

Answered by
BushDoctor on
October 27, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

You may just leave them as they are! They are completely hardy in your area. Thank you for clarifying, as I can now help you care for these better. More than likely, these will even keep a good deal of their foliage through the winter. Whatever does start to die off, you can clip it and remove the dead debris. Fortunately, there is no extra care to be taken.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
September 2, 2018

Q. preparing seed for planting coral bells

What is meant by “six-week cold period prior to planting”?

Answered by
MichiganDot on
September 3, 2018
A.

Many plants produce seed that requires special preparation. Cold, moist stratification, CMS is a common one. Seed is mixed with a small amount of damp sand or potting mix, placed in a plastic bag and stored in the refrigerator for the designated period. Or seed can be sown outdoors in mid-winter to mimic natural CMS. The cold, moist environment followed by seed sowing at room temperature is a signal to seed to germinate.

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