Top Questions About Banana Pepper Plants

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Questions About Banana Pepper Plants

Asked by
Anonymous on
November 17, 2010

Q. Yellow Banana Peppers

Why do the Capsicum (yellow banana variety) stems go purple? Is it normal? The flowers are dropping off; is it due to that?

Answered by
Heather on
November 19, 2010
Certified Expert
A.

Purple stems on a pepper plant are normal in most cases, but in some cases it can be a phosphorous deficiency. Just to be on the safe side, I would add a little bone meal to the soil to add phosphorous, but likely this is a normal reaction.

This article will help you with why the flowers might be falling off:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/pepper-blossoms-falling-off.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
May 25, 2011

Q. Pepper Plants

I planted several red/green/banana pepper plants. I also planted zucchini and tomato. Something is eating all the leaves off of the pepper plants. The garden is fenced. No bug evidence. What can I spray that is safe to keep animals/bugs safe?

Answered by
Nikki on
May 25, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

It is likely slugs. They only come out at night, so they are hard to spot. This article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/facts-about-slugs-and-how-to-kill-garden-slugs.htm

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Asked by
banjo on
June 29, 2011

Q. Pepper Problem

My green peppers all year have developed black necrotic places near the flowering end, which leads to fruit rot. The plants look healthy and the soil sample is good for calcium but a little low on potassium. The banana peppers in the next row are doing great and are very productive.

Answered by
Heather on
July 4, 2011
Certified Expert
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Asked by
Anonymous on
August 8, 2011

Q. Hot Banana Pepper Plant Problem

I live in northern Minnesota, and my hot banana peppers, while having fairly abundant yeild, are starting to dry up on top of the plant. The leaves on the top part of the are shrivelling up. Any clues as to what may be causing this? We have had ample rain as well as very warm temps with plenty of sun.

Answered by
Nikki on
August 9, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

It may be suffering from wilt. This problem normally affects tomatoes, but can also affect peppers. This article will help:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/pepper-wilt-on-plants.htm

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Asked by
wayne on
August 24, 2011

Q. No Banana Peppers

In my garden this year we planted banana peppers. They grew, but produced no peppers. Can you tell me why?

Answered by
Nikki on
August 25, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Add more phosphorus to the soil. Your soil is probably lacking this and peppers need this to flower. This article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/phosphorus-plant-growth.htm

If you are seeing blooms or fruit, but they are dropping, this article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/pepper/pepper-blossoms-falling-off.htm

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Asked by
rock777 on
April 8, 2012

Q. is it safe to eat peppers which could have a disease

Can you cut out a bad spot on a pepper and eat the rest? I have a few small brown spots on my hot banana peppers. The spots are very small ( about 1/16 inch ) and located in a small area. Is it ok to cut the spots out and use the rest?

Answered by
Nikki on
April 9, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

Brown spots on peppers are usually the result of sunscald (too much light) or blossom end rot. Both of which are not harmful to you. So yes, you can safely removely the bad areas and eat the peppers.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
August 5, 2012

Q. Banana Peppers

I would like to know how I can store the banana peppers when I first pull them but don’t use them immediately. Or, should I not pull them until I’m ready to use them?

Answered by
Nikki on
August 6, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

When the season comes to an end, pull the entire plant and hang it to dry. Keep fresh fruits in the crisper or a cool, dark location for up to a week, or freeze for later use.

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