Top Questions About Weeping Mulberry Trees

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Questions About Weeping Mulberry Trees

Asked by
kakalvy on
June 23, 2012

Q. Weeping mulberry curly leaves

My weeping mulberry, 8 years old, has started to develop curly leaves. There is still new growth, and the leaves look fine. It has been very hot here this spring, little rain.

Answered by
Nikki on
June 25, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

The tree could be suffering from heat stress or drought-related stress (or even a combination of the two). Give the tree some extra water and this should help.

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Asked by
butterfly#9 on
June 13, 2014

Q. my weeping mulberry leaves are curling

My weeping mulberry leaves are curling. Zone 6 had an awful winter, even the deer leave it alone. It is in the hot sun all day. The leaves show no bugs but are forming a cup. What to do?

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
June 13, 2014
A.

Extremes of weather can cause the leaves to curl, but also the symptom can be caused by virus, bacterial, or micro organism infection. The only way to know for sure is to have the leaves analyzed. You can have this done at the local Extension Service office. This link will help you locate one: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/extension-search/

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Asked by
Plants&Flowers on
June 14, 2014

Q. Weeping Mulberry Bush

I’m interested in buying a Weeping Mulberry but none of the local nurseries or big box stores have ever heard of it. I’m also interested in a Bubby Bush. Both of these shrubs grow in a yard in West Virginia.

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
June 14, 2014
A.

Ah, the Carolina allspice. When I was a little girl in N.W. Pa, we had one that my gramma called a "sweet bush." And the weeping mulberry. Neither of them are fashionable these days, so to find them will take a bit of effort online, but you should be able to track down a nursery that will send some to you. I would try the local Extension Service first, to see if they can point you toward a source. This link will help you locate one of those: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/extension-search/

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Asked by
chasser57 on
October 13, 2014

Q. weeping mulberry tree does not fruit

Tree looks healthy but only fruited once when planted as a mature tree about 8 yrs ago. I have started to feed with dynamic lifter, is this OK?

Regards

Chas

Answered by
Volcano2014 on
October 14, 2014
A.

There might not be another tree in the area so it will not fertilize.

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Asked by
Vanxbebb on
August 31, 2016

Q. Weeping mulberry tree

My weeping willow, which is approximately 40 years old, has developed some brown sap looking places on the bark, plus it seems to be dripping the sap. Can you tell me what this could be and how do I stop it?

Pat VanBebber

Answered by
Alisma on
August 31, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

The most common cause of dripping willow trees is an insect infestation. Most likely, the dripping substance is actually honeydew, the waste of aphids and scale insects that consume sap. Both commonly infest willows. In this case, you will probably be able to see the insects themselves, though they are tiny:

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/insects/aphids-tree-disease.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/insects/control-plant-scale.htm

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Asked by
pamk3618 on
December 14, 2016

Q. Purchasing plants

I’ve been looking to buy a weeping, fruiting mulberry for a couple of years. Any suggestions, please?

Answered by
Alisma on
December 15, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Pandora's Box Weeping Mulberry is one that produces good fruit. Dwarf Weeping Mulberry is a smaller option that is also fruiting- that one can be weaker and gardeners have had problems with it tipping over.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
January 27, 2017

Q. transplanting, removal and transporting

A lady has offered me a weeping mulberry tree for free if I remove it. The tree is 15 years old and although I haven’t viewed it yet, I’m concerned which is the best way to remove it, transport it and replant it. Or is it too old to be transplanted? In Southwest, Western Australia. Thank you.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
January 27, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

This would be a big job, but I would say it is doable.
You would need to move the tree in very early spring.
The branches can be tied upward to allow you to work around the tree.
You would began digging around the drip line of the tree and began severing the roots.
After you have loosened and freed the root ball it would need to be slid unto a tarp and the root ball wrapped.
You would need to carefully water and monitor the tree.

I do think it would be wise for you to research the availability and the fast growth rate of purchasing a new tree.
You can then compare the work and time involved with moving vs purchasing a new tree.

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