Top Questions About Sweet Pea Plants

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Questions About Sweet Pea Plants

Asked by
garyg1645 on
November 3, 2015
North San Diego County

Q. Sweet Peas Shrubs

We have planted sweet pea shrubs along our driveway where they get shade and sun year round. The new plants have been in the ground for about 2 1/2 months. A couple of the plants look like they are dying off. They get water two times a week. What is happening??

Answered by
garyg1645 on
November 3, 2015
A.

What is the answer??

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Asked by
PETERHILKEN on
April 11, 2016

Q. sweet pea plants

I stopped my sweet pea plants, but the new side shoots have become leggy. Should I stop them again before planting them out into the final growing bed?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
April 12, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

There is varying opinion on when to pinch back Sweet Peas.
Here is an article that will help you decide the best approach for your plants.
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/sweet-pea/pinching-sweet-peas.htm

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Asked by
sheila51 on
August 11, 2016
cm8 1jl

Q. Sweet Peas

When will my Sweet Peas be finished and what do I do next?

Answered by
Alisma on
August 11, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

"Sweet pea" usually refers to an ornamental flower that produces an inedible pod. Don't eat these, because they are toxic! Just enjoy the flowers.

See this article for plant care:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/sweet-pea/care-of-sweet-peas.htm

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Asked by
shirley.whyte on
August 29, 2016
Clarksville, Maryland.

Q. transplanting wild sweet peas

I have a very old wild sweet pea in my garden and I would like to split it and transplant half of it. Will this kill it or shall I try?

Answered by
Alisma on
August 30, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Yes, you can transplant perennial wild sweet pea. Sometimes a very old plant won't make it, but it's worth a try. This plant can be transplanted in late summer.

Before transplanting, you can cut back most of the foliage but leave about 12 inches worth, to ensure the roots will be able to support all the foliage that is left. See this article for tips on avoiding transplant shock:

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/learn-how-to-avoid-and-repair-transplant-shock-in-plants.htm

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Asked by
sheila51 on
September 2, 2016
cm8 1jl

Q. Looks like Sweet pea but no Peas

Can someone tell me what this plant is called? It looks like a Sweet pea but without the peas!

Answered by
Alisma on
September 2, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Yes, this is a sweetpea. The pods will develop after the flowers are pollinated. Since the flowers are blooming, the pods should appear soon.

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Asked by
TonyH on
February 26, 2017
14380 Northern France

Q. Polygala dalmaisiana

After some severe low-temperature weather recently, our shrub, as detailed above, seems to have been burnt. Its leaves are light brown, although there are a few green leaves near the centre. We live in Normandy, France and usually plants grow really well here.

May we have your advice on pruning our shrub, please?

Many thanks.

Answered by
Alisma on
February 27, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

Even though your shrub appears to have some damage from the cold, it's best not to prune it yet. Many plants recover well by themselves once warm weather returns.

Wait until late spring or summer to see if it puts out new leaves. If some branches produce leaves and others go bare, you can then prune out the dead branches or portions of branches. You can also use this test to see whether bare branches are dead:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/tgen/tree-scratch-test.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
March 25, 2017

Q. planting Sweet Peas

I live in the PNW area, Snohomish, Wa to be exact, and I have started my sweet peas indoors and I am wondering when it’s safe to plant outside. I am wanting to way lay the seedlings from getting leggy. I’m just not sure what the timing is here.

Thank you,
Katharine andrews

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
March 26, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

Your growing zone is 8a. The average last frost date for your area is between April 11 and 20th. Your seedlings can outdoors sometime after these dates.
You do always have to monitor weather trends, as these dates are average guidelines.

Make sure you harden off your seedlings before being placed out into the garden full time.
Here are some links with more information.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/sweet-pea/care-of-sweet-peas.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/sweet-pea/pinching-sweet-peas.htm

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/planting-zones/washington-planting-zones.htm

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/seeds/when-to-transplant-a-seedling-plant-into-the-garden.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/seeds/leggy-seedling.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/seeds/how-to-harden-off-your-seedlings.htm

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