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Asked by
grenz on
August 12, 2019
hd8
Answered by
BushDoctor on
August 12, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

Without any other identifying features, it is hard to tell. I would pin it down to one of three things, though.

A walnut, sumac, or ash tree. Unfortunately, without any information on the tree, such as what country the tree is located (I'm not familiar with climate zone hd8, as we use a single number, single letter system here in the US Example: 5a) the smells of the leaves or bark, or any other information that you can give. The closest I can get you is the three that I have mentioned here.

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Asked by
Jay92 on
August 24, 2019
Dorset, UK

Q. What is this.

Hey, I asked this a while back but have lost the answer.
This is fast growing, even when chopped down and also it spreads! Any ideas on what it is and how to kill it off?

Answered by
BushDoctor on
August 26, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

Without any other identifying factors, it is very hard to say. This resembles several genus, and countless species within the genus.

I will give you my best guess based on the pictures and description.

I have pinned it down to a few Genus. Rhus, Sorbaria, and Sorbus. A sumac, false spirea, and quickbeam, respectively.

Getting rid of it will require you to dig it up, completely. Pouring boiling water on it a few times a day for two or three days will provide a quick death, as well. Other means will include herbicides, and chemicals, should boiling water fail. (It won't fail often)

This article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/weeds/using-herbicide-in-gardens.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
August 25, 2019

Q. Sumac Type

We have what we believe is Sumac growing out of a scrub that we have had for over 10 years. We want to make sure it isn’t poison and if it isn’t can we re-transplant it in our yard. Picture attached. Thank You

Answered by
GKH_Susan on
August 27, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

Yours looks more like the common sumac than the poison sumac to me. The description of the tobacco sumac resembles your picture. The poison sumac has wider leaves than your photo. Here are the comparisons:

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/sumac/sumac-tree-info.htm

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/weeds/poison-sumac-control.htm

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Answered by
MichiganDot on
August 27, 2019
A.

Sumac is great for large landscapes and native areas. However, most types spread via underground lateral roots (rhizomes) so they grow as a thick, dense clump of plants, not single specimens.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
December 6, 2019

Q. Collecting sumac seeds in december

Howdy I was wondering if you could help me. I noticed the dried up berries are still hanging on to the sumac trees and I’ve never grown them before, so I figured I’d give it a try. I grabbed a few of the bundles of seeds and took them home and put them in a zip lock baggy like I do most my seeds, but I noticed when you bust the dried berries open that the seeds are flat and don’t look any good.  But I was wondering if that’s how there supposed to look or not.

Answered by
GKH_Susan on
December 9, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

You should harvest seeds when they are dark brown and dry. Boil water, remove from heat and add seeds. Let them soak for 24 hours to improve germination rate. Give them a dormancy period in the refrigerator for about 30 days. Plant seeds outdoors when danger of frost has passed. Choose a sunny site with well draining soil. Plant them about 3/4 inch deep. Water well.
Sumacs are native to the U.S. and not too picky about care.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/sumac/sumac-tree-info.htm

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