Top Questions About Sumac Trees

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Questions About Sumac Trees

Asked by
Anonymous on
July 15, 2011

Q. Poison Sumac

How do we get rid of this? It grows in the garden. I pull it up and it pops up someware else. I’ve cut them all down. And the next year there were more. It’s driving me crazy. Can you help?

Answered by
Susan75023 on
July 18, 2011
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Asked by
Anonymous on
March 11, 2012

Q. Fragrant Sumac

Every year around middle to late summer rust develops on the bushes. We had sprayed them in the latter part of the year, but it just turned them more brown. We are using a product called Microzeb (fungus killer). What should we use now to prevent this? What should we do in the latter months? When do we apply the product, and in which months?

Answered by
Nikki on
March 12, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

I would recommend treating them with fungicide (neem oil is an effective fingicide) frequently at the beginning of the year, including the soil around the plants. Also, prune some of the interior branches out so that the plant has better air circulation.

This article will help you with preventing future rust problems: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/disease/learn-about-plant-rust-disease-and-rust-treatment.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
November 30, 2014

Q. mulched leaves from an African Sumac Tree

We mulched our new flower bed with leaves from our African sumac tree. The petunias are all dying. Are the African sumac leaves poisonous? If so, how long do I have to wait before I can plant in the area again? What can I do?

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
December 1, 2014
A.

I could not find African sumac listed in any of the allelopathic lists, although sumac as a genus is listed. So it's possible. Petunias are also quite susceptible to juglone ( the poisonous compound in allelopathic plants.) The poisonous compounds of black walnut (the most famous allelopathic tree) are supposed to be rendered inert after a month of hot composting, but some people say it may take a year for all the poisonous substances to be gone from the soil. Unfortunately there's not a lot of research on this subject.
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/info/allelopathic-plants.htm
Here is an article that goes over some possible problems with petunias: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/petunia/problems-with-petunias.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 22, 2015

Q. Sumac Looking Sick

The leaves on our sumac are not developing. They are small, weak and curled, and pull off easily. Some brown, sticky, oozing earlier this spring on the trunk and branches. It looks like it needs water, but everything else around it is OK. It is still suckering. The tree is about 15 ft high and must be over 15 years old. What could be wrong?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
June 23, 2015
Certified Expert
Asked by
gamblntown on
October 12, 2015

Q. African Sumac is peeling bark

My African Sumac is peeling bark. Should I be concerned? I live in Las Vegas. It gets plenty of water.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
October 14, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

Peeling bark can be from environmental issues. Cold temperatures can cause some damage to the leaves and trunks.
The natural aging of the tree can also account for changes in the bark. The young wood starts out as a light tan to gray color and with age cracks to revel reddish colors.
African Sumac is quite drought tolerant and will actually do better with less water.

Inspect the plant carefully to determine if you see any insects or other signs of fungus.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/tgen/peeling-bark-on-trees.htm

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Asked by
Legoman6 on
July 7, 2016
U.K. Nottingham

Q. Rhus typhina

We have an established 15 year old Rhus typhina, which this year failed to flower and appears to have died. There are some new suckers coming through but the main tree seems to be dead. We are looking for an answer as to what has happened. Do they just die?

Answered by
LuvaLeigh on
July 8, 2016
A.

They are a self propagating tree so it will likely regenerate from the suckers. There are many different reasons as to why it could have died; temperature fluctuations, fungal or insect damage, even mowing to closely to the roots. They generally can live up to 60 years so I don't think age is a factor here.

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Asked by
4merchfo on
September 6, 2016
Mesquite, NV 89027

Q. African Sumac Tree

Growth (leaves) is dying in some of the branches in our 8 year old African Sumac tree. The companion Sumac tree about 50 yards away is healthy and thriving. What can we do to save the tree that is suffering the loss of healthy branches?

Answered by
Alisma on
September 6, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

This could be a problem with either overwatering or underwatering, or a disease problem. Overwatering could occur if your soil has poor drainage.

See this article about cotton root rot, a disease which can affect African sumac and which could cause dying leaves and branches:

http://www.azlca.com/uploads/documents/03-cotton-texas-root-rot.pdfRoot rot or crown rot

This tree can also be infected by verticillium wilt disease. See this article:

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/disease/verticillium-wilt-treatment.htm

You may also want to consult an arborist or your local extension service to see what can be done.

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