Top Questions About Spaghetti Squash Plants

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Questions About Spaghetti Squash Plants

Asked by
Dale Sapp on
July 21, 2017
Newark,oh

Q. spaghetti squash

How do you ripen spaghetti squash off vine. Had btown spots on belly so had to pick so wouldnt rot.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
July 24, 2017
Certified Expert
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Asked by
Anonymous on
July 23, 2017

Q. Spaghetti Squash buds and fruit

My spaghetti squash plants are beautiful, nice big leaves and lots of blossoms. When the baby squash forms, it grows to about an inch or so and then suddenly dies off. It looks very healthy as it forms but usually as it gets past that one inch size, in the next 24 hours it’s rotting at the open end, still looks OK on the stem end. By the next day, it’s obvious that this one isn’t going to make it.

We have been having torrential downpours almost weekly…I haven’t watered the plants much extra. I know a lot of the rainfall is sheltered from the soil by these huge leaves. Is this more likely to be too much water or not enough?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
July 24, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

There can be a few reasons for Blossom End Rot, the heavy rain certainly can play a part.
Here is an article that will help you pinpoint the causes.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/squash/squash-blossom-end-rot-causes-and-treatment.htm

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Asked by
cmallen5 on
August 5, 2017
91344

Q. spaghetti squash

we bought a spaghetti squash plant and a zucchini plant. when they started producing both had zuccini’s on them now the spaghetti squash IS PRODUCING THE spaghetti squash, what is happening

Answered by
shelley on
August 9, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

It could possibly be the outcome of cross pollination: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/vgen/cross-pollination.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
August 20, 2017

Q. Spaghetti squash

It’s more than halfway through August and my spaghetti plant is, I think, showing signs of bacterial wilt, should I harvest my fruit?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
August 21, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

If your vines are completely or almost completely wilted, then yes, I would recommend harvesting now since the squash won't grow any bigger. If only a few leaves are wilted you can continue letting the squash grow, just in case it's not bacterial wilt. But remain vigilant since you may have to harvest in a hurry if the plant dies.

The following article says infected plants die in 7-10 days so you'll soon know the answer:

https://extension.umd.edu/growit/bacterial-wilt-vegetables

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Asked by
LindaGee89 on
January 9, 2018
Floresville, tx

Q. I need help identifing this plant

So I planted a spaghetti squash seed and I thought that’s what was growing until my mother in law came to visit and pointed out that the leaves didn’t look like spaghetti squash leaves. So now Im growing a plant and have no idea what it is. I would love to find out if anyone knows what it could be.

Answered by
MichiganDot on
January 9, 2018
A.

Looks like cilantro. Does it have a smell if a leaf is crushed? It also appears to be woefully deficient in light. Winter sun can't support plants that require full sun; supplemental lighting is needed.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
May 27, 2018

Q. Spaghetti squash

I have several spaghetti squash vegetables looking good on the vine but, several others seem to be wilting to their demise. Why might some die while others are doing great?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
May 28, 2018
Certified Expert
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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 19, 2019

Q. I planted a spaghetti squash, some of them are the yellowish color I’m use to and as you show. Others are coming in green with d

Others are green with darker stripes. At first I thought they’d turn yellow but they are the first off the vine and have stayed green. Any ideas? Are these ok to eat?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
June 19, 2019
Certified Expert
A.

This is completely normal. These will come in a wide range of colors and shapes if you plant the seeds yourself. There is nothing to be concerned with, and they are completely edible.

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