Top Questions About Romanesco Broccoli Plants

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Questions About Romanesco Broccoli Plants

Asked by
LeisahBlue on
July 31, 2013

Q. My Romanesco Doesn’t Look Like It Should

My Romanesco broccoli doesn’t have a tight head but what looks like a bunch of little stalks like broccoli with leaves in between. Is that how it’s supposed to look? Does anyone have pictures at the various stages of growth? What am I doing wrong? I wish I could upload a picture.

Answered by
Nikki on
July 31, 2013
Certified Expert
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Asked by
LeisahBlue on
August 2, 2013

Q. My Romanesco Doesn’t Look Like It Should

This is a follow up to my first question. I read the article on the Romanesco broccoli as well as many others. My romanesco never looked like the romaneco in the picture. It never had a tight head and always had leaves between what appeared to be stalks. I’ve grown regular broccolis and cauliflower with success in the past. What would make it fail to head and just go straight to seed. No article covers whether it would get side shoots if I were to cut the head off. I tasted a stalk and it’s really bitter and actually looks like it is going to seed.

Answered by
AnnsGreeneHaus on
August 2, 2013
A.

It's possible that you have broccoli rabe. From your description, that's my guess. I've never eater nor grown any, but am familiar with the plant. It is very possible that somewhere in the packaging of seed, broccoli rabe seed got into the romanesco packet by mistake. (It happens more often than you'd think!) Broccoli rabe is bitter, and doesn't make heads. It's definitely not a tight, neat head like broccoli or romanesco. If it's turning yellow (like old broccoli would), it's probably bolting. This article might help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/broccoli-rabe/broccoli-rabe.htm

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Asked by
theplantlady.barbara on
November 11, 2013

Q. What should I do to produce broccoli heads?

I have broccoli, Romanesco variety, planted since early June from seed. It has not produced any heads. What should I do to produce the heads? I have 5 plants from very large to small.

4 plants share a raised bed (Kingsize waterbed frame) with other cole crops, reg. broccoli, turnips. I know I need to fertilize. Is Miracle Gro ok? Would compost or mulch help? I found with regular broccoli adding manure seems to harshen the taste, but I do add manure and peat to beds each spring.

Answered by
AnnsGreeneHaus on
November 11, 2013
A.

Most cole plants perform better in cool weather. If you are growing from seed, consider having the plants ready to get into the bed 8-10 weeks before last average frost date for your zone for a spring crop. For a fall crop, try to plant 8-12 weeks before first average frost date. It seems that Romanesque is unreliable in forming heads at times. The reason has yet to be discovered. Since this plant is more closely related to cauliflower than broccoli, I suggest adding some lime, either at transplant, or as a side dressing.
Hopefully, this article will help:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/broccoli/growing-romanesco-broccoli.htm

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Asked by
Dijon on
August 2, 2014

Q. I have romanesco still growing from last year

I have romanesco growing from last year. Will it produce curds this year?

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
August 5, 2014
A.

Broccoli is well known to reseed itself, although the resultant heads may be small, or few, or not taste good. Of course, they may also taste even better than the parent plant. I would expect romanesco to act similarly. This article has more information on this fascinating vegetable: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/broccoli/growing-romanesco-broccoli.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
July 17, 2015

Q. Romanesco

I have tried growing romanesco for the first time. My plants are gorgeous – huge and healthy. But NO romanesco. What is the trick?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
July 18, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

Have you been fertilizing? It sounds as if there is too much nitrogen in the soil, which promotes lush, healthy growth but without enough phosphorus to balance it out, you will get little to no heads. You can try to offset the nitrogen by adding some phosphorus rich fertilizer or bone meal to the soil.
Here is more information on Romanesco care: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/broccoli/growing-romanesco-broccoli.htm

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Asked by
cfadden on
August 17, 2015
Minneapolis, Minneosota

Q. broccoli romanesco

I am growing broccoli romanesco for the first time. I have all leaves and no heads. Will it still produce heads? It’s already middle of August.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
August 18, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

It may be to warm for your plants to form heads.
They are considered a cool weather crop.
Here is a link with more information.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/broccoli/growing-romanesco-broccoli.htm

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Asked by
jjewils7 on
September 26, 2015
Illinois zone 5

Q. Romanesco plants

I planted a lot of broccoli and cabbage this year. The cabbages, though slow, have formed nicely and I’ve had few problems with insects due to an abundance of spiders in the garden. The broccoli was planted in both raised and not raised beds. I have heavy clay soil, which I add to each year. It was a cool, wet, year over all, but we did have a couple hot weeks here and there, especially mid July. I planted seed instead of plants, though I guess plants would’ve been better here in North Central Illinois. Anyway, my broccoli bolted, we had some for salads but none for freezing. And I have Romanesco out there that never flowered, and is 5 1/2 feet tall with leaves as long as my arm! It looks healthy enough but no flower heads. Now that it’s cooler again, will it flower? Is there something I should do?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
September 28, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

It is quite late in the growing season and your garden is most likely nearing it's end.
This certainly was a trying year in your garden. Gardening is usually different each year. Try to just learn from this years successes and misses and plan for next year.
You may want to do some amending to the clay soil to help with water drainage and overall soil conditions for next year.
Here are some links for you with more information.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/broccoli/how-to-grow-broccoli.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/cabbage/growing-cabbage.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/how-to-improve-clay-soil.htm

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