Top Questions About Redbud Trees

Click on links below to jump to that question.

Questions About Redbud Trees

Asked by
Anonymous on
February 21, 2011

Q. Flowering Trees

Our 8′ tall, 2. 5-inch diameter (by the soil level), 6-year-old Redbud (Forest Pansy) has never flowered in the spring. The tree is healthy, with beautiful color of leaves. I don’t know why it has never produced the pink flowers. We live in Zone 6-7 on the West Coast.

Answered by
Nikki on
February 22, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

If the tree looks healthy, then it is one of three things. First is a lack of phosphorous in the soil, which would prevent blooming. Add some phosphorous rich fertilizer and have the soil tested for nutrient levels. Next would be a lack of sunlight. Are there any other trees or building blocking light to it? Third might be bad timings on freezes. If you get a late frost pretty consistently in spring, the frosts may be killing off the buds. There is not much help for that.

00
Was this answer useful?
Join Us - Sign up to get all the latest gardening tips!
Asked by
Anonymous on
March 4, 2011

Q. Drip System Watering for Container Trees

I’m very excited to learn that I can have a red bud tree in a container. Is it too much water if I drip water it every day in the heat of summer? Where I’m going to place this tree is in the west, very hot sun (Texas style). Will I have good success, or am I wasting my time and money? Should I look for another type of container tree that’s got some beauty to it?

Answered by
Nikki on
March 4, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

I think it would be an excellent idea to use a drip irrigation system for a container tree. You may need to adjust how much water it gets, but just keep an eye on making sure the soil is damp, not soaked, and it should be fine.

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
Anonymous on
May 15, 2011

Q. Split Tree

I have a Redbud tree that the wind split. What can I do save it, or will it be ok?

Answered by
Nikki on
May 16, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Bolt or tie the split back together, if you can. It may heal itself back if they are held together. Paint the open wound with a fungicide to deter disease, but nothing else. Tarring or sealing the wound can trap disease in the wound, which will harm the plant.

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
Anonymous on
July 1, 2011

Q. Transplanting Tree

I have a small young redbud tree (about 6′ tall) that was pruned a few days ago. Can I safely transplant it or should I wait until the fall? It is planted too close to the house at this time and I would like to move it to the back yard.

Answered by
Nikki on
July 2, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Fall is the best time to transplant trees with the least amount of shock.

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
Anonymous on
August 6, 2011

Q. Damaged Redbud Tree

I have a Forest Pansy redbud. Wind damage has split about a 2-inch limb off main trunk. Limb is lying on the ground still attached to trunk, although there is about a 6-inch split on main trunk. Can I raise the branch some? And how to clamp it to the main trunk in an attempt to save the branch? What can I fill in the split with to prevent rot and further damage?

Answered by
Nikki on
August 6, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

You can try using a bolt split branches to the main trunk.

This article, in the section on split forks, will have steps for using a bolt to repair the split:
http://essmextension.tamu.edu/treecarekit/index.php/after-the-storm/tree-damage-and-hazard-assessment/repairing-storm-damaged-trees/

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
joe88 on
September 22, 2011

Q. Beaver Tree Damage

I have a beaver that has chewed one redbud tree down and is now working on another. I put chicken wire on this tree after the first incident. The enterprising beaver starting chewing above the wire and cut about halfway through it. I have wire now higher. Is there something I can repair this tree with to save its life?

Answered by
Heather on
September 26, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

If the beaver did not girdle the tree (remove the bark all the way around) the tree can recover. Unfortunately, there is no product that can be used to fill the damaged area that would not expose the tree to other issues. It is actually best to leave the area open so that it can heal. You can treat the area every few weeks with a fungicide to help keep rot from setting in while it heals.

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
Edi B on
May 4, 2012

Q. Pruning Guide for Red Bud

Pruning guide for red bud.

Answered by
Heather on
May 12, 2012
Certified Expert
1 2 3 9
Learn

Learn From
Your Peers on
Our Blog

Visit Our Blog
The website that started it all!
Main Website

Do you know a lot about gardening?
Become a GKH Gardening Expert

Learn More