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Top Questions About Pothos Plants

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Questions About Pothos Plants

  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    November 19, 2010
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Brown spots and edges in houseplants are typically caused by watering issues. I would first check if they are rootbound. That is most likely the cause. This article should help you: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/what-causes-brown-edges-on-leaves-of-plant.htm

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  • Answered by
    Heather on
    December 15, 2010
    Certified Expert
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  • Answered by
    CaptainAng on
    February 10, 2011
    A.

    Pothos, also known as Devil's Ivy is originally from the Solomon Islands in the Pacific. It prefers indirect sunlight (the edges are easily burned and turn brown quickly if left in direct sun).
    Keep your pothos warm; a minimum of 65 degrees. It also thrives in high humidity but do not over water.
    Hope this helps~

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  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    May 16, 2011
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Without knowing your exact conditions, it is hard to say whether you are under or over watering. I would recommend that rather than watering on a schedule, that you water by touch. When you go to water, fell the top of the soil. If it is dry, water the plant, if it is not, do not water the plant. This will ensure you are watering to the plant's needs.

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  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    June 3, 2011
    Certified Expert
  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    June 4, 2011
    Certified Expert
    A.

    The brown spots are commonly caused by over watering. With the cooler temps, they just do not need as much water. In the circumstances, I would actually recommend waiting till you see some wilting before watering. Then soak the pot in the sink to rehydrate the rootball. Once the brown spots clear up, you can resume watering just when the soil feels dry.

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  • Answered by
    Heather on
    June 20, 2011
    Certified Expert
    A.

    The white spots are likely a fungus, but could be a pest. The fungus can be treated with a fungicide and pests can be treated with a pesticide. I personally like neem oil as it is both a fungicide and a pesticide, so it treats for both at the same time.

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