Top Questions About Pothos Plants

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Questions About Pothos Plants

Asked by
sherie on
September 2, 2012

Q. Pothos Is Getting Yellow Leaves

My pothos is getting yellow leaves. Does this mean too much or too little water?

Answered by
Nikki on
September 2, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

This is commonly caused by over watering. When you go to water, feel the top inch or so of the soil. If it is dry, water the plant, if it is not, do not water the plant. This will ensure you are watering to the plant's needs. If you feel that you have not been over watering your plant and would like additional reasons as to why it may be turning yellow, this article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/plant-leaves-turn-yellow.htm

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Answered by
theficuswrangler on
September 6, 2012
A.

When pothos get yellow leaves, it's almost always because the plant is too dry. When they are too wet, you see browning first on the leaf stems, then on the tips of the leaves, then the brown starts to extend down the sides of the leaves. If the overwatering goes on for a long time, you will also see the new leaves start to get smaller. Investigate the moisture content of the soil by testing it at least 1/2 way down the pot. You can find some tips on checking soil moisture at my YouTube channel http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBBh0RPPqu0&feature=plcp

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Asked by
mrs fick on
October 1, 2012

Q. Pothos Turning Colors

I have an Pothos vine plant the vine its self is turning yellow but the leaves are fine what do i do

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
October 2, 2012
A.

I have seen this happen many times. Usually it is a sign that there is root degeneration, could be caused by being too wet (in which case the leaves and stems are not getting enough water because the roots aren't functioning), or being too dry (in which case again the leaves and stems aren't getting enough water. Test the soil. Easiest thing to do is stick a kebob-skewer into the soil all the way to bottom of pot, Run the skewer between your fingers, you will be able to feel if its wet or dry. If dry, water more, or more often. Whenever you water, water enough that water runs out the drainage holes. If wet, water less, or less often. Soil should feel almost dry all the way to the bottom of the pot before you water again.

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Asked by
mauget1 on
November 23, 2012

Q. Why Do I Have Brown Spots on My Pothos?

Why do I have brown spots on my pothos?

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
December 4, 2012
A.

I have been an interior landscaper for 30 years, and in that time I've taken care of tens of thousands of pothos. If you have brown tips on the ends of the pothos leaves, most of the time it is indicating overwatering. Brown spots on the interior of the leaves is usually sign of a fungal or bacterial disease, and these are most often linked to overwatering also.

Before watering the pothos, you need to check the soil moisture near the bottom of the pot, not just on the surface of the soil, because the roots are mostly in the lower 3/4 of the pot. Stick a probe of some sort - a bamboo kebob skewer works well - into the soil, as if you were testing a cake. When you pull it up, you should feel the barest hint of dampness, and there might be only a few crumbs of soil sticking. Then you can water the plant.

Don't worry about misting and pebble trays - pothos grow luxuriantly in commercial situations where there is not such fuss. They are quiten content in the same environment as us.

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Answered by
AnnsGreeneHaus on
November 23, 2012
Asked by
Nancracker on
December 20, 2012

Q. Pothos Plant

My Pothos plant has begun to get small white things on it. What do I do? It looks weird. The plant has been in only one room since I got it a year ago.

Answered by
AnnsGreeneHaus on
December 20, 2012
A.

please describe "white things". Where are they located, what size are they, do they move or fly, are they cottony looking and any other information.

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Asked by
sstrenton on
December 18, 2013

Q. does my Oregonian pothos need a drainage hole in the pot?

I want to transplant my Oregonian pothos to a bigger pot. I have a beautiful pot but has no holes in the bottom.

Answered by
Heather on
December 21, 2013
Certified Expert
A.

It would be best if it had holes, simply because it makes taking care the plant easier in terms of making sure it is getting the right amount of water.

That being said, you can use a pot without holes as long as you are careful about watering. Just don't add too much water to it and the plant will be fine.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
January 22, 2014

Q. Pothos

Does a pothos cutting have to be rooted in water before placing in dirt or can a cutting be placed directly in dirt? Also, I put some cuttings into some dirt after being rooted in water and they are not doing well. What can I do?

Answered by
Nikki on
January 22, 2014
Certified Expert
A.

While it roots easily in water, it is always better to root cuttings in soil like potting mix, perlite, vermiculite, or other solid medium. Some plants that are rooted too long in water simply learn to live in water and cannot live outside of an all water environment. Some examples of these plants are pothos and philodendron. Once plants develop enough roots to survive on their own, you should move them to soil. If yours is not doing well, it could be that the soil is either too wet or too dry. For more information, this article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/pothos/propagating-pothos.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
March 19, 2014

Q. Yellow Leaves on Pothos Plant

The leaves on my pothos are turning yellow. I have had the plant in direct sunlight. The leaves started turning yellow so I moved it to a place with indirect sunlight. The leaves are turning yellow now on numerous leaves. What can I do to stop this? Thanks for your help.

Answered by
Nikki on
March 19, 2014
Certified Expert
A.

This is commonly caused by over watering. When you go to water, feel the top inch or so of the soil. If it is dry, water the plant, if it is not, do not water the plant. This will ensure you are watering to the plant's needs. If you feel that you have not been over watering your plant and would like additional reasons as to why it may be turning yellow, this article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/plant-leaves-turn-yellow.htm

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