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Asked by
mwestbrook47 on
June 9, 2012

Q. why is my pampas grass not making plumes?

The plant is three years old and it is in a good drainage area. It is slowly growing and has never made any plumes. My sister-in-law bought it for me at the same time she bought one for herself. Her plant is much bigger than mine and has plumed the last two years. She has an automatic watering system and we thought that might be the difference, but I have been watering mine every day too, so I do not know what is wrong.

Answered by
Heather on
June 19, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

If your grass is not making plumes, it is likely either too much nitrogen or too little phosphorous. This is caused typically by ornamental grass that is planted close to a lawn that is well fertilized. Lawn fertilizer is is high in nitrogen, which inhibits flower (or for ornamental grass - plume) development.

Both sides, either too much nitrogen or too little phosphorous, can be corrected with some high phosphorous fertilizer for the plant. Bone meal is a good fertilizer in this case. Try adding some to the plant and that should correct it.

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Asked by
sibthorpe on
August 12, 2012

Q. Pampas Grass

I have an out of control pampas grass, which I would like to clear but don’t know how to destroy it. I have tried cutting it back, but as you know it simply grows back. Is there any sort of weed killer that I could use?

Answered by
Nikki on
August 13, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

Once you cut the plant back to the ground, you'll need to dig up as much of the root system as possible using a shovel, pick axe, etc. Be sure to discard these in trash bags or burn (if in a suitable location and it's safe to do so). Then apply a glyphosate herbicide (like Roundup) to the freshly dug area as well as to any plants that may pop back up. It may take several applications to fully eradicate the plant but with vigilence and patience, you will eventually win the battle.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
August 18, 2012

Q. Pink Pampas Grass

I have been growing from seeds pink pampas grass to plant in at my second home in Nags Head, NC. Do you recommend that I grow the grasses indoors for the winter (in Annapolis, MD) or plant the pampas grasses in Nags Head, NC during late September? It stays above 60 down there through December. February is the coldest month getting down to 40.

Answered by
Nikki on
August 20, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

Pampas grass is actually quite hardy and will survive mild winters such as this, so go ahead and plant the grass outdoors. For growing info and care, this article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/foliage/pampas-grass/growing-pampas-grass.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
September 25, 2012

Q. Pampas Grass

How do you tell a male from a female Pampas Grass before they begin to flower?

Answered by
Nikki on
September 25, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

You won't be able to tell what you have until it begins developing plumes (flowers). However, if this was purchased from a reputable nursery, the label should list its sex. Normally, females are the most commonly grown in home landscapes. They are much showier than their male counterparts with fuller plumes of silk-like hairs, of which the males do not have.

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Asked by
carol51 on
October 1, 2012

Q. Can You Tell Me Why My Pampas Grass Has Never Flowered

Can you tell me why my pampas grass has never flowered? It is 3 years old.

Answered by
Nikki on
October 2, 2012
Certified Expert
Asked by
hcastaneda on
December 29, 2012

Q. Pampas Grass

I bought several pampas grass plants from a local nursery two years ago. They did not say if they were male or female. I did not know to ask. How can I tell? I bought them for their beautiful plumes, and they have never flowered. Help.

Answered by
AnnsGreeneHaus on
December 30, 2012
A.

Sometimes grass needs 2-4 years to mature to blooming size, especially if the plants were seed propagated. Also, if growing conditions are 'perfect', the plants might be making an unrestrained root system. Many plants bloom when they are in less than perfect conditions because they feel "threatened", and will try to insure survival of the fittest. Both male and female pampas grass bloom.

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