Top Questions About Night Blooming Cereus

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Questions About Night Blooming Cereus

Asked by
tararene223 on
March 4, 2014

Q. Night Blooming Cereus

I think my Night Blooming Cereus is dying. The long stem is wilting and the leaves are turing dark green. Does anyone have advice on how to save it?

Answered by
Heather on
March 7, 2014
Certified Expert
A.

It sounds like it may have root rot. Is it in a container? They are more susceptible if they are in a container. Here is some information that may help:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/disease/treating-root-rot-gardening-tips-for-housplants.htm

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Asked by
kaymool on
May 8, 2015
Seattle - but this is an indoor plant

Q. night blooming cereus

My night blooming cereus is growing a long shoot that is 4 or 5 feet tall right now. It has some hairlike (inch long) air roots coming out of it, but no leaf buds. Should I leave it to grow or should I cut it off?

Answered by
shelley on
May 8, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

The queen of the night has the potential to be a very large plant, up to 6 feet tall in containers such as yours. What you are seeing is the nature of the beast - it will form tall stems on which flat leaves emerge. You can use a bamboo rod to support your plant. Or, if you desire, you can shorten the stems to a more manageable height - the best time to prune is after flowering.

For more information on the queen of the night plant, please visit the following link:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/cacti-succulents/night-blooming-cereus/night-blooming-cereus.htm

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Asked by
Roe1938 on
January 31, 2016
Rockville Centre, Long Island, New York

Q. Night Blooming Cereus

Our plant is well over 6 feet tall – full of leaves on the top and just stems on the bottom by the pot. We have it supported in a “tomato cage” on the top of the pot, which supports the long heavy branches. Can I cut it back and get it looking more full on the bottom by cutting one or two stems back? Can I also root and plant the leaves that are on the top of the stems down in the pot?

Thank you,
Rosemary Donohue
(Long Island, New York)
[email protected]

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
February 1, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

The first week of March is a great time to prune your Cereus.
Using a sterile knife or scissors prune the plant back severely, the stems can be left about 6" high.
Water throughly and allow excess to drain freely.
Use a 15-30-15 fertilizer application applied every 4 weeks/ until September.
Water only when the soil feels dry to the touch after pruning.

Give the plant 8 hours of good indirect light.
Flowers form on new growth and make sure you place a good sturdy trellis into the pot to support the new growth.

Here is a link with more care information.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/cacti-succulents/night-blooming-cereus/night-blooming-cereus.htm

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Asked by
suefish99 on
May 1, 2016
33803

Q. night-blooming cereus

I have a night-blooming cereus that is now very gangly and I would like to prune/trim it. I have been given cuttings before, but I don’t know where to cut the plant to prune it. How do I propagate my night-blooming cereus? What kind of soil does it like?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
May 2, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

You can take 6 to 9" cuttings during the growing season, spring thru summer.
Wrap the cuttings in a paper towel and let it sit in a cool area for a few days.
The cut end needs to become calloused.
Add 1 part perlite to 3 parts potting mix and insert the cutting upside down with the calloused end up into the moistened medium.
Place the pot in a bright, shady location and make sure the soil does not dry out.
It will take 3 to 6 weeks to grow roots.
Water weekly during the growing season and once a month during the winter.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/cacti-succulents/night-blooming-cereus/night-blooming-cereus.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
August 25, 2016

Q. Night-Blooming Cereus blossoms

My Night-Blooming Cereus has 10 little blossoms forming right now! Should I nip some of them to encourage stronger, better blooming of just a few — or leave things alone? (Mine is in a pot in my city garden here in DC. A friend reports the same condition with hers in rural Virginia.)

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
August 26, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Do not trim any flowers. You have probably waited some time for your plant to bloom.
Enjoy the blossoming!
Here is a link to refresh you on the care.
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/cacti-succulents/night-blooming-cereus/night-blooming-cereus.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
November 30, 2016

Q. Night blooming cereus pruning

I have 2 cereus that are many years old, bloom frequently, but are huge and “leggy.” I would like to prune them, but if I do, all I will have will be the heavy, stiff stems without leaves where the buds form. Is this what I should do and wait for new leaves to grow or should I start new plants from the cuttings and ditch the old plants?

Have seen numerous instructions on starting new plants; however, I’m not interested in new plants unless that is my only option. Would greatly appreciate any advice.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
November 30, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Regular pruning will keep the plant from becoming to leggy and heavy.
You may want to go ahead and start out with new plants from the cuttings.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/cacti-succulents/night-blooming-cereus/night-blooming-cereus.htm

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Asked by
Elizabeth A Harlow on
January 21, 2017
24522

Q. Night blooming cereus

What are the long rod like things that are sprouting and growing upward some reaching so far as high as five feet?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
January 22, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

The queen of the night has the potential to be a very large plant, up to 6 feet tall in containers such as yours. What you are seeing is the nature of the beast - it will form tall stems on which flat leaves emerge. You can use a bamboo rod to support your plant. Or, if you desire, you can shorten the stems to a more manageable height - the best time to prune is after flowering.

For more information on the queen of the night plant, please visit the following link:

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/cacti-succulents/night-blooming-cereus/night-blooming-cereus.htm

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