Mint Plants

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  1. Mint Has Overtaken My Garden and Heading for the Grass.
  2. Growing Mint From a Root
  3. Do I Need to Put a Stake in the Ground to Attach the Mint Plant To?
  4. Killing Mint Plants
  5. Disposal of Mint Roots
  6. Mints
  7. Dying Container Mint
Asked by taykim4 on January 22, 2011
Mint Has Overtaken My Garden and Heading for the Grass.

How do I get rid of it and be able to plant vegies soon? Is round-up a good idea? If so, how long should I wait to replant with tomatoes, chard, etc? I live in Las Vegas, NV so anytime now is okay to plant.

ANSWERS
Heather
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Round-up will work and you can plant in about 1 week (2 weeks to be on the safe-safe side) after using it. That being said, you will likely see the mint come back regardless.

If you have not read it, this article may be helpful:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/herbs/mint/invasive-mint-how-to-kill-mint-plants.htm

No matter what you do, you will need to lay down a heavy layer of mulch and/or a weed blocker like newspaper to help kill off the roots of the mint plants.

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Asked by Anonymous on March 10, 2011
Growing Mint From a Root

What is the best time of year to pot up a mint root from the parent plant?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Spring is the best time, but it being mint, you can really do it any time of year and it will do fine.

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Asked by kpashia on April 10, 2011
Do I Need to Put a Stake in the Ground to Attach the Mint Plant To?

I am new to gardening and I have planted some mint, it is growing horizontally. I have read on some places that it is supposed to grow 8 inches tall. Should I attach it to a stake, or be patient and wait for it to root? I planted it 5 days ago. It has doubled in size, but not vertically!

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Typically, mint does not require any staking, though it will not hurt the plant to do so...if it makes you feel more at ease. There are numerous types of mint plants, so it growing characteristic depends largely on the variety you are growing. This article will help you with growing mint in the garden: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/herbs/mint/how-to-grow-mint-plants-in-your-garden.htm

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Asked by Anonymous on April 17, 2011
Killing Mint Plants

We have a large area (6 feet by 6 feet) of mint plants in our yard that need to be killed.  The previous owners of our new house said the area of mint has been there for years and they tried to kill the plants too.  I am willing to use anything.

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Round-up or boiling water will kill it, but they will both also kill anything else they come in contact with. You can also try covering the area with a scrap piece of carpet for a few months. This article will also help:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/herbs/mint/invasive-mint-how-to-kill-mint-plants.htm

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Asked by Anonymous on May 2, 2011
Disposal of Mint Roots

I have mint (which I did not plant) that has taken over my flower garden. Yesterday I dug up a bucket full of roots. Now what should I do with them? I can’t put them in the mulch pile or they will grow again. How do I kill them and eventually dispose of them? I know I did not get all the roots, so am sure I will be pulling out more buckets of them.

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

You can simply put them in the trash. If you want to avoid adding to your trash though, you can boil the roots for 2-3 minutes and then place them in the compost. The boiling water will kill them and they will not be able to grow.

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Asked by Anonymous on May 25, 2011
Mints

I am crazy about mints and I have a growing collection. I am concerned about having too many in a small space. Will they all just morp into one big mint and lose their separate identities? Is there a minimum spacing to keep this from happening? I can only find general info on the web and even less in books. Am I worrying needlessly?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert
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Asked by Anonymous on May 25, 2011
Dying Container Mint

Recently I was given a somewhat sorry looking mint plant. I looked it up and placed it in a sunny window after hearing it loved the sun, but overnight the edges of the leaves started darkening and curling in, and the leaves kept wrinkling up almost as if they were scorched! So I moved it out of direct light, but still in a sunny room, yet the leaves continue to burn and die, and the stems are browning. It’s like the whole plant is drying up, but the weather hasn’t been that hot. I water it, there are no signs of insects, it’s out of direct light, but it still isn’t doing well. What am I doing wrong?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

If it was dug up for you from the ground, it may be transplant shock. This article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/learn-how-to-avoid-and-repair-transplant-shock-in-plants.htm

If not, it may be root rot. This article will help with that:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/disease/treating-root-rot-gardening-tips-for-housplants.htm

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