Mandarin Trees

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  1. Fertilizing Mature Citrus Trees
  2. I Have Struggling Citrus Trees
  3. My Fruit Tree Did Not Bear Any Fruit This Year
  4. Rootstock
  5. Moss or mold on orange and mandarin trees
  6. Dried leaves on a young mandarin tree
  7. japanese mandarin tree
Asked by Anonymous on April 12, 2011
Fertilizing Mature Citrus Trees

How do I know which citrus fertilizer is best for our 15+ year old orange and lemon trees? The greenery is plentiful and healthy looking on all trees except our mandarin orange, which is losing leaves like crazy. Do I choose a food with low nitrogen to improve the flavor and juiciness or high nitrogen? Low phosphorus or high?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert
Asked by malestrom on January 13, 2013
I Have Struggling Citrus Trees

Well established orange and mandarin next to each other. This year they are really struggling even though they have had mulch added for the first time in years. Loss of leaves is obvious. I have a wild passion fruit that has sprung up nearby. Should I get rid of this?

ANSWERS
AnnsGreeneHaus

How deep was the mulch? More than 3-4 inches can smother a plant. Did you put mulch around the trunk?
The following statement came from the article listed below: "Never pile the soil or mulch up against the stem or it will get collar rot, which is extremely common in citrus trees."
The article:
http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s972708.htm

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Asked by cazzmear on May 29, 2013
My Fruit Tree Did Not Bear Any Fruit This Year

I have a Miho Satsuma Mandarin tree that I have had for 2 years. It had fruit last year but, this year it bloomed but all the blooms fell off. The leaves are all green and growing. Why did this happen?

ANSWERS
AnnsGreeneHaus

Possible it's weather related or lack of pollination. This article might help; https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/apples/no-fruit-on-apple-trees.htm

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Asked by Anonymous on March 15, 2014
Rootstock

I have a Satsumma Mandarin tree. Almost a year now the rootstock started growing and it is much taller than the grafted part. Will this delay the growth of the grafted tree and lessen the fruits?

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Yes, you should remove the rootstock growth. It does rob the graft of nutrients and will eventually kill it, if left to grow.

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Asked by Peter Smyth on October 3, 2014
Moss or Mold on Orange and Mandarin Trees

The orange tree was planted about 3 years ago and has moss or mold growing on trunk. The mandarin tree about 30 years ago has moss or mold on trunk and branches. Is the moss/mold dangerous to trees and how and when do I get rid of it? Thanks.

Peter Smyth

ANSWERS
theficuswrangler

There's a big difference between moss and mold. Moss can and does grow on most trees, and is harmless. Mold is usually a sign of some disease or damage on the tree. It sounds like you could use the help of a professional to see if you have a problem, and what to do about it. You can contact a registered arborist in your area, or you can call the nearest botanical garden who will either advise you, or connect you with the local master gardener program.

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Asked by Curt on March 17, 2015
Dried Leaves on a Young Mandarin Tree

My mandarin tree, about 2 years old, has dried curled-up leaves. I was wondering if I am over or under watering it?

ANSWERS
Downtoearthdigs
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Here is a link to proper care of your Mandarin tree.

To much water may be your issue, but inspect your plant carefully for any insect damage or disease.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/tangerine/mandarin-orange-tree-care.htm

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Asked by Sofiatanph on April 5, 2015
Japanese Mandarin Tree

I was about to cut off the thorny part of my Japanese mandarin tree when I noticed small fruit growing out. I have attached the photos of the tree with the small fruit, which has a texture like that of a peach. Do I have to cut it and start over? The lower part of the tree is ok, with no thorns. I’m quite confused. Please help

ANSWERS
shelley
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

How old is this tree?

The thorns are not necessarily a red flag. Many young citrus trees develop thorns to protect their delicate vegetation. As the tree matures, it should grow thorns less frequently. This article will explain the thorns in more detail:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/citrus/thorns-on-citrus-trees.htm

Is this the first time this tree has started fruiting? If no, has it ever fruited successfully? If yes, then it may be too early to judge on the fruit. If the fruit, after full development and ripening, turns out abnormally then you may want to consider that the rootstock may have overtaken the scion. Almost all citrus trees sold are grafted trees. The desired tree is grafted onto a very hardy but inferior fruit tree. This insures the superior fruit have a strong root system. But, sometimes, mostly due to damage to the scion (the good tree), the rootstock takes over. Once the rootstock takes over, the only thing to do is to remove the tree and start over.

This article will explain more:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/tgen/can-grafted-trees-revert-to-their-root-stock.htm

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