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Top Questions About Magnolia Trees

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Questions About Magnolia Trees

  • Answered by
    Heather on
    October 29, 2012
    Certified Expert
    A.

    I am not in TX, but I do have a Magnolia on the Eastern side of the US and I can tell you that the seeds on my tree do reach maturity in the fall.

    I also know that magnolia's have a hard time producing seeds that reach maturity. You may be seeing this for the first time simply because the weather this year was conducive to successful magnolia pollination.

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  • Answered by
    AnnsGreeneHaus on
    November 13, 2012
    A.

    It sounds like it could be any of four things.. Most of the large growing southern magnolias won't bloom until they have some age on them. It is common for young plants to be 8-10 years old before having a lot of blooms.
    You might consider having the soil tested. Magnolias prefer an acidic soil, and you can easily alter the pH if needed.
    It could be the type fertilizer you are using. Too much nitrogen can cause a plant to put out foliage instead of blooms.
    AND, the greywater could be too alkaline. Greywater containing sodium, bleach or borax can damage plants.

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  • Answered by
    AnnsGreeneHaus on
    April 22, 2013
    A.

    This article night answer some of your questions: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/magnolia/magnolia-tree-care.htm
    You can locate other articles by entering "magnolia" into the search box at the beginning and end of the article.
    If your plant is only 18" tall, you might consider planting in a nursery pot with a 50-50 mix of good topsoil and potting soil until the root system is more developed. Even after planting a tree with a good root system it can take 2-3 years before you will see optimum growth. (Rule of thumb: first year, it sleeps; second year, it creeps; third year, it leaps.)

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  • Answered by
    AnnsGreeneHaus on
    April 29, 2013
    A.

    You haven't damaged the tree. It is a good idea to remove dead and making the plant more aesthetically pleasing is always good for you. All is well. As far as remedy for pruning, once something's been cut, it can't be reattached.

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  • Answered by
    AnnsGreeneHaus on
    May 21, 2013
  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    November 1, 2013
    Certified Expert
    A.

    The powdery residue is from a fungal issue called powdery mildew. You can try treating the tree with neem oil, often sold as fruit tree spray in some places. Here is more information: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/disease/get-the-cure-for-powdery-mildew.htm
    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/problems/pests/neem-oil-uses.htm

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  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    January 10, 2014
    Certified Expert
    A.

    It sounds like the tree has a fungus. I would treat the tree with a fungicide every 2-3 weeks for a few months. I personally like neem oil as a fungicide, as it is systemic and you do not need to be able to reach all parts of the tree in order for it to be effective.

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