Top Questions About Japanese Maple Trees

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Questions About Japanese Maple Trees

Asked by
Anonymous on
December 21, 2010

Q. Treating Brown, Waxy Leaves

I have a Japanese 40-inch tree and some leaves are turning brown and waxy (and then die). What should I do?

Answered by
Nikki on
December 22, 2010
Certified Expert
A.

It sounds like the tree is not getting enough water. This can be caused by several issues. We recommend this article to help you learn more about the issues that can cause these symptoms https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/japanese-maple/japanese-maple-care.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
December 26, 2010

Q. Very Sick Japanese Maple

We have a 25+ year old Japanese maple, which for some reason is not leafing up like it used to. The leaf cover is only at the extremities of a few branches; otherwise, the tree is bear. Up until this year, it has been great, full of leaves; but it now looks dead. If it has leaves, albeit sparce, there must be life in it. I need some suggestions as to what might cause this, and maybe some remedies.

Answered by
Heather on
December 26, 2010
Certified Expert
A.

For a Japanese maple of that age, there is a chance that it is dying from simple old age. It depends on the variety, but if it is a smaller variety, it typically have a much shorter lifespan than the larger ones.

As far as possible diseases, this article has several possibilities that you can use to see if it might be what is affecting your tree: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/japanese-maple/japanese-maple-problems.htm

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Asked by
lotito11 on
January 1, 2011

Q. Split Jap. Silkleaf Maple Tree From Blizzard

I have a grafted silkleaf maple tree that is 4 years old and was doing great then we got hit with a blizzard that dropped 4 ft. of snow on top splitting all the main branches away from the tree but still attached. Tree is dormed and has dropped all folage for winter

Answered by
Heather on
January 1, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Bolting a split like that is the common solution for this.

This article, in the section on split forks, will have steps for using a bolt to repair the split:
http://essmextension.tamu.edu/treecarekit/index.php/after-the-storm/tree-damage-and-hazard-assessment/repairing-storm-damaged-trees/

But, that being said, it does not always work. You may want to bring in a tree specialist to look at it to help increase you chance of success.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
March 10, 2011

Q. Split in the Crotch

I live in southeast Pennsylvania and have a damaged Japanese Maple. The tree is about 36 inches tall and its crown is about 48 inches wide. The trunk is about 2-1/2 inches in diameter. The trunk becomes two (branches) at the top, which I’ll call the crotch. The heavy snow has split the crotch and the trunk about 9 inches downward (about 1/4 inch to over 9 inches). Would you have any advice on repairing this (specimen)?

Answered by
Nikki on
March 11, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

I would secure the two side of the split back together and hope that they heal. It does not always work, but otherwise, the tree sounds as though it would be a lost cause, so it is worth trying this.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
March 27, 2011

Q. Planting Japanese Maple in Container

I have purchased a small Garnet Japanese maple. I want to be able to take this tree with me when I move in the next 4-5 years. Will planting it in an appropriate container help to keep it small enough to move later? It is now in a 5-gallon pot and is about 4 feet tall. It is a little, slim tree with a gently curved shape and a small number of branches. If I can use a container, how large should it be? I understand that I need to provide proper drainage and will need to check it more often to make sure it has enough water.

Answered by
Nikki on
March 28, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Yes, you can keep it in a container. Japanese maples grow slowly and therefore make a great container tree. You should put it in a pot that is 2" wider than the root ball is currently. You can go a bit bigger than this if you do not want to repot for a few year. Here is some information that will help you: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/containers/how-to-grow-container-trees.htm
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/trees/tgen/growing-trees-in-containers.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
April 26, 2011

Q. Japanese Maple

I would like to plant a Japanese maple indoors but I worry about sap from the tree damaging our rugs and furniture. Is the Japanese maple a plant that I need to worry about sap dropping?

Answered by
Nikki on
April 26, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

You can keep it in a container. Japanese maples grow slowly and therefore make a great container tree indoors. If you are worried about sap, you can set the potted tree on a plant skirt. You can also set it outdoors during warm weather, when sap is most prevalent.

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Asked by
Moonstruck on
April 29, 2011

Q. What/Why Do I Have Dead Baby Flies on Tips of Dead Japanese Maple Branches?

I have 5 laceleaf maples that have multiple baby dead flies on the tips of the brown dead branches. One of which it appears the entire tree is completely dead, except for the trunk itself. I am not sure if aphids got to them as I don’t see any; however, something has attracted the flies to all of them, but then they die either while they are sucking the sap or after sucking what attracted them to begin with. Can you please tell me whether it is from aphids or the flies? Please HELP. I am trying to determine if ladybugs will work or if I should spray with Dawn dish soap. Also, will Dawn kill ladybugs? (In case I need both of these organic measures. ) Thank you for any help.

Answered by
Heather on
May 2, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

It could be aphids or a similar pest that sucks the sap and produces honeydew, which could attract the flies. The honeydew is sticky, which may have trapped the flies on the leaves.

I would treat the trees with neem oil. It is organic and very effective on the kinds of pests that suck sap and kill plants that way. Here is more information on it:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/pesticides/neem-oil-uses.htm

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