Top Questions About Grape Tomato Plants

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Questions About Grape Tomato Plants

Asked by
Anonymous on
July 29, 2011

Q. Blossom End Rot on Plum Tomatoes

We planted several varieties of tomato plants. Our grape tomatoes are doing very well, yielding lots of large red tomatoes. In the same garden we have plum tomato plants and they have started to ripen this week, but we have a problem. The bottoms are black and insides look fuzzy and moldy and are not edible. My question is: how did the plants get this disease, and will all the fruit be spoiled by it on these particular plants? Is there something we can do?

Answered by
Nikki on
July 29, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Blossom end rot is treatable and is normally temporary. This article will explain why it happens and how to fix it:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomato/tomato-blossom-rot.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
September 1, 2011

Q. Grape Tomatoes Green Inside

My grape tomatoes look great on the outside but the central core of a tomato becomes tough and remains green or greenish-white. The walls of the fruit can also be pale and seeds are stunted and immature. What causes this? (My other tomato varieties have performed very poorly with lots of problems. I do not seem to have much luck with tomatoes at all. )

Answered by
Nikki on
September 2, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

The weather could very well be the problem. When temps are above 85 F, tomatoes slow ripening. When temps are 95 F or higher, tomatoes can stop ripening all together. Many parts of the country are experiencing high heat, and if you are as well, this could cause the tomatoes to either ripen unevenly or stop ripening all together. It should correct itself when the temps come down.

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Answered by
heart on
September 29, 2011
A.

It sounds like stink bugs to me. They suck the juice out of tomatoes leaving green hard spots on the inside. If your other varieties are doing the same thing, look for brown or green stinkbugs. Sunlight might be a problem if they
are not getting enough sun.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
January 17, 2018

Q. inside tomatos

My plants that I have inside are grape tomatoes. They have fruit on them. I use grow lights on them. They were doing really well then began to turn white-ish. Them seem to also be spindly. Would appreciate advice. Thank you.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
January 18, 2018
Certified Expert
A.

If the leaves look like they have a white powder on them, that is powdery mildew, a fungal disease. Please see these articles about it:

http://livegpath.cals.cornell.edu/gallery/tomato/powdery-mildew-on-tomatoes/
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/disease/powdery-mildew-homemade-and-organic-remedies.htm

Another possibility is tiny white pests on your plants. Some insect pests can appear white, such as whiteflies, thrips, and scale insects. If you have these, you'll be able to see them if you look closely.

Spindly plants are usually not getting the optimal amount of light. If your plants are producing enough fruit, though, it's probably fine to keep the light level where it is, and the spindliness is just an aesthetic problem. If you want them less spindly, you may need to place them near a window too, or you may need to add more grow lights or a mylar reflector. Adding too much nitrogen fertilizer can also cause plants to grow taller too quickly and become spindly.

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