Top Questions About Gaura

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Questions About Gaura

Asked by
Anonymous on
November 5, 2016

Q. Gaura plant

Gaura plant growing well but is along the ground not growing upright. The soil is good and lavender planted there is doing well.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
November 7, 2016
Certified Expert
A.

Many varieties of Gaura plant have a tendency to fall open.
Little can be done for this growing pattern.
You can try planting varieties such as 'Pink Cloud" Gaura. It has a strong upright growth pattern and does not fall open.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/gaura/growing-guara-plants.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
May 29, 2017

Q. Gaura

Why is Gaura not growing.
It’s spring and they look dead

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
May 30, 2017
Certified Expert
A.

Gaura plants can sometimes survive the winter in colder zones, and it seems to depend on how wet they get. Well-draining soil and a drier site will increase their survival in the winter.

The plant should not be cut back in the winter. The remaining foliage may help to protect the roots from cold. You can cover them when it is about to freeze, or when the foliage is no longer green.
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/gaura/growing-guara-plants.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
October 25, 2017

Q. Gaura

I have 3 Gaura plants that I love. I planted them this past spring. I read that they may not be winter hardy in my 5b zone. I will cover them with straw for the winter. My question is, should I cut them down prior to covering them? Also, when is a good time to cover them?

Answered by
MichiganDot on
October 25, 2017
A.

Gaura is one of those perennials that isn't long-lived so it is best to let them go to seed at the end of the season. My gaura have made it through zone 5 winters without any special care. You may have a special cultivar that is less hardy; I don't know. Cut the stems down all the way; the plant sends up new ones next year. The leaves may be left intact. Mulch with a mixture of chopped/shredded leaves and wood mulch. Snow is a great insulator for plants so you can always pile it over the gaura but remove excess snow when spring melt starts.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
May 31, 2018

Q. Gaura, whirling butterfly

My plant is in a large pot on my deck. While I was out of town, we had many hard rains, overwatering all my pots. I came home and all the lowers leaves were brown as if under watered. I shielded the plant, let it dry out, the leaves are coming back as is some of the flowers. Can I cut back the stalks to let the new growth return?

Answered by
MichiganDot on
June 1, 2018
A.

Cutting back the bloom stalks is how gaura is dead-headed so it is fine to trim them all the way back to the basal leaves.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 17, 2018
Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
June 17, 2018
Certified Expert
A.

You can cut Gaura back once by one-half when the plant is about 12 inches tall for a bushier plant with only about a one-week delay in blooming or cut it back to about two-thirds its unpruned height one more time in midsummer for blooms starting in late summer on a compact plant.
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/gaura/growing-guara-plants.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 26, 2018

Q. Growing Gauras

I just got 3 Gaura plants planted them in pots their in full sun I’ve been watering them now there dying. What have I done wrong.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
June 26, 2018
Certified Expert
A.

Guara need full sun and well draining loamy soil.

This article will help you access the plants and the care they need.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/gaura/growing-guara-plants.htm

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Answered by
MichiganDot on
June 27, 2018
A.

Gaura have a deep taproot and relatively few small feeder roots. They don't like to be transplanted - true of all plants with taproots. They also like soil on the dry side. Take your plant and put it in the shade or create temporary shade with a box or cloth. The Gaura will recover. When it looks happy again, slowly get it used to full sun. If it wilts during the day, it isn't ready for full sun. I have Gaura and have moved it so I know what you are going through. Be sure to collect some seed; depending on where you live, Gaura are considered "short-lived" meaning 2-3 years. I find that they self-sow and I don't need to replant them in my zone 6a garden.

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