Top Questions About Corn Plants

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Questions About Corn Plants

Asked by
Anonymous on
January 19, 2011

Q. Three Sisters Garden

I would like to grow a three sisters garden (corn, beans, and squash) this year, and I’m not sure when to start everything. My last frost date is April 20 – May 10, and my first frost date is Oct 30 – Nov 10. When should I plant everything?

Answered by
Nikki on
January 20, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Since you generally plant the corn first in this type of garden, you'll want to make sure that the soil is warm – at least 55-65 degrees F. before planting. This article should help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/children/a-three-sisters-garden.htm

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Asked by
Anonymous on
February 21, 2011

Q. Is This Soil Okay?

My dad recently burned a log and stick pile near our house and I plan to use it to grow corn and pumpkins this year. The soil is quite ashy. Is this okay? What can I do to improve it?

Answered by
Nikki on
February 21, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

It should be ok. I would water it well and till or hand dig the soil well to mix the ash into the soil before planting anything, just to make sure that the ash is not too concentrated and burns a plant.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
April 30, 2011

Q. Garden Size

I know what I want to plant and have an area that is FULL SUN. I just don’t know what area is truly required for the vegetables I am interested in (36 stalks of corn, 2 rows potatoes, 1/2 row carrots, 1/2 row sweet onion, 1/2 row broccoli, 1/2 row lettuce, 1/2 row green pepper, 1/2 row roma tomato, 1/2 row beef tomato, watermelon and cantaloupe). Can you give me some guidance?

Asked by
Anonymous on
May 23, 2011

Q. When To Plant Crops

When do you plant corn, okra, squash, cucumbers, cabbage, crouter peas, and beans?

Answered by
Nikki on
May 24, 2011
Certified Expert
Asked by
Anonymous on
June 29, 2011

Q. Corn And Tomatoes

I have planted a vegatable garden. This is the first garden in this area. Tilled several times prior to planting in sandy soil. The tomatoes and corn are not doing well. The tomatoes look like they are wilting. I pulled the yellow leaves from the bottom of the plants. I water them at least once a day or every other day. They are produce tomatoes. but the plants look ‘dwarfed’. The corn also looks dwarfed. The stalks are all different heights and even the small ones have the tassels like the tall ones. They fall over when watering. The zucchini, bell peppers, and cucumbers are doing well. The squash is kind of slow growing. Don’t know if I did not put enough peat moss on soil prior to planting. I have put the spray fertilizer on once since these plants started looking this way. Any suggestions?

Answered by
Nikki on
June 30, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Your watering program may be leaching the nutrients from the soil, always a problem with sandy soil. Try watering less, but deeply, and use your foliar fertilizer more often.

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Answered by
coreyd69 on
June 30, 2011
A.

blood meal for nitrogen and bone meal for the roots

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Asked by
Anonymous on
July 26, 2011

Q. Aphids on Veggie Garden Plants

I have a veggie and fruit garden with corn, cucumber, zucchini, cantaloupe and watermelon. All of the plants seem to have lots of aphids on them and the leaves are starting to curl. What can I use as an aphid deterrent/control and also be able to eat the fruit?

Asked by
Anonymous on
August 14, 2011

Q. Seeds Too Old?

I planted my garden for the third year with the same seeds bought 2 or 3 years ago. Every single seed I planted, bi-colored corn, green beans, snow peas, cucumbers and green onion was the same as the 2 previous years with one exception. I added a fertilizer/weed killer to the soil. I was expecting a good year since this was the third year of planting. To my surprise, not one single seed sprouted. Were they too old? I’ve never seen anything like it before. Please help.

Answered by
Nikki on
August 14, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

If you have older seeds lying around, it is entirely possible that they have lost some of their viability. As seeds age, the likelihood that they will germinate decreases. However, you can test the viability of seeds in one of two ways:

Slightly dampen a paper towel and place the sample seeds on it. Fold the barely damp paper towel it in half over the seeds. Enclose in plastic wrap or place inside a sealed plastic bag so it will stay damp. Label the package with seed name and date. Set the package in a relatively warm place (70 to 75 degrees) such as the top of your refrigerator or on a high shelf. Do not put it in direct sun. OR you can simply float them in water. If they sink, they're still good and if they float, toss them.

Here is an article that you may find helpful: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/seeds/planting-old-seeds.htm

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