Top Questions About Bleeding Heart Plants

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Questions About Bleeding Heart Plants

Asked by
Anonymous on
May 2, 2011

Q. Bleeding Heart Bush

When is the best time to split a bleeding heart bush? I have two huge plants and my mom would like part of one. When is a good time, and how do I split them?

Answered by
Nikki on
May 3, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Right now (spring) is a great time to do this. Dig up the plant and cut the rootball in half, making sure that both halves have stems and roots. Then you have two plants.

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Asked by
lisapeace on
May 16, 2011

Q. Why Are My Bleeding Heart Plants’ Leaves Turning Yellow?

I have two Bleeding Heart plants. One is pink, this one looks very healthy and has bloomed. The other one, white, is very small, has not bloomed and the leaves are turning yellow.

Answered by
Heather on
May 19, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

It sounds like a fertility problem. Give the plant some balanced fertilizer and that should help. You likely will not get blossoms on it this year, but it will help make it healthier for next year.

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Asked by
lesliereiter on
May 16, 2011

Q. Plants Trampled by Dog

My bleeding heart, lupine and sedum were trampled and broken by my dog. Will they recover, and what should I do to them? Should I remove all of the broken stalks?

Answered by
Heather on
May 19, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

The bleeding heart will recover by next year. The lupine may as well. The sedum will recover this year. I would wait to see if the stalks start to die before removing them on the bleeding heart and lupine. You can try staking them back up and they may still bloom. The sedum, take the broken stalks and stick them in the ground. They will root and grow new plants.

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Asked by
nellseph71 on
June 10, 2011

Q. Bleeding Heart

Can I cut the bleeding heart down when it’s done blooming, and will it come back next year?

Answered by
pink on
June 12, 2011
A.

I have two bleeding hearts and have had them for five years. What I do is after their done blooming I cut them back a bit as it is still nice to have the plant for the summer and in the fall before it freezes I cut them down and every year they come back. Hope this helps you , Pink...

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Asked by
jjandkimmysmom on
June 11, 2011

Q. Can I Separate Bleeding Heart Into Container to Sprout the Next Winter

I’ve got a bleeding heart that they say you have to separate every three years. Well I don’t know where I want to plant them next year and I’d like to grow some for my mother. Can I put them in 5 gallon buckets this fall? Will they pop up like they would if I plant them in the ground?

Answered by
Heather on
June 17, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

You can do this, but be sure to place the pots neat a sheltered spot for the winter, like the foundation of a building or with the pots covered in mulch. Plants in containers experience conditions like those of plants in one zone colder than your own, so putting them somewhere that will shelter them will increase the chances that they will survive the winter.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
April 15, 2014

Q. Trimming Bleeding Hearts

Can I trim back some of the new growth of a Bleeding Heart?

Answered by
Nikki on
November 30, -0001
Certified Expert
A.

These plants are normally cut back once they begin withering away towards end of growing season. Since they tend to bloom in spring, I would not recommend cutting any of the new growth, as this could interfere with its flowering. Once the plant has put on its spring-flowering show, however, you may trim back some of the growth if necessary. For more information on growing this plant, this article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/bleeding-heart/bleeding-heart-care.htm

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Asked by
angelia on
May 3, 2014

Q. bleeding heart broken

My newly planted bleeding heart got broken during a storm. What do I need to do? Only one of the flowering stems is damaged, also does it need to have support?

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
May 3, 2014
A.

There are 2 types of plants commonly known as bleeding heart. The first is the pink heart-shaped flower, a herbacious perennial; this article has growing information: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/bleeding-heart/bleeding-heart-care.htm
The second is a woody vining perennial, white with dark red; this article has some info on that one: http://www.unf.edu/physicalfacilities/landscape/plants/Clerodendron_thomsoniae_-_Bleeding_heart_vine.aspx
Both plants are strong growers, and new growth should come along quickly. Of course, you'll cut away the broken part. If it's not broken through, you should probably still cut it, to allow new growth. If you want, you can try to splint the broken part with sticks and wrapping - strips of old panty hose work nicely - the stems may grow back together. Here's some information on that process, if you want to try: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/info/reattaching-broken-stems.htm
The clerodendron is a large vine, and definitely needs support, such as a porch or tree, unless you want to let it scramble about on the ground. The other is more of a bush, and the taller varieties might need support.

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