Top Questions About Better Boy Tomato

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Questions About Better Boy Tomato

Asked by
Anonymous on
July 12, 2011

Q. Tall Tomatoes

My plants are 6 foot tall and fill my 4 foot cage. One plant (Better Boy) has 28 green tomatoes. Others in my area are harvesting lots of tomatoes, but mine are still green. I have been suckering. Should I be pruning the end of the new shoots to discourage vine production and encourage fruit production?

Answered by
Nikki on
July 12, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

I would not prune anymore at this time. It is probably a bit of the reason you have green tomatoes. The plant has been spending energy on healing cuts rather than fruit production and the fruit set a bit later. It is the trade off when you prune and sucker. It also sounds like you may have too much nitrogen, which would also contribute to delayed fruit setting. The excess nitrogen will work itself out over the season, but for next year, make sure you use a fertilizing mix (chemical or organic) with more phosphorous.

As for this season, the tomatoes will ripen. You just need to give it some time.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
April 30, 2012

Q. Tomato Pollination

If I only have two tomato plants (a ‘Better Boy’ and a ‘Big Boy’), will they pollinate each other to bear fruit?

Answered by
Nikki on
May 1, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

Tomatoes are self pollinating. They do not need other tomatoes plants to produce fruit.

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Answered by
sugar snap mama on
May 6, 2012
A.

Tomatoes self pollinate. If you only had one tomato plant, you'd still get plenty of tomatoes. No worries.

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Asked by
kc2765 on
May 17, 2015
Souther Indiana

Q. Tomatoes

How can I grow a robust dark green colored, but healthy fruit producing, tomato plant with the exception of a traditional “Miracle Grow” fertilizer? I grow Better Boys as a favorite. I have a soil tester. My plants do ok but have that “spindley” look. Looking for that deep dark green heavy base stalk plant. Have raised beds and amend the soil routinely.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
May 17, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

I would recommend using a fish emulsion.
Below is a link about making your own, but it is readily available at any garden center.
I use it about once a week on my tomato plants. Follow the directions on the bottle for diluting the concentrate and applying to your tomatoes.
I also use epsom salt every couple of weeks. I have great success using these two simple, economical and natural fertilizers on all my vegetable plants.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/fish-emulsion-fertilizer.htm

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/epsom-salt-gardening.htm

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Answered by
Karen Koch on
May 17, 2015
A.

Manure

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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 24, 2015

Q. Tomatoes not blooming

I live in central OK and have planted Better Boy tomatoes this year. The plants are quite tall and bushy, but no blossoms. We are having temps in the 100’s, and I wonder if this is why they are not blossoming. My Romas, however, are putting out fruit. All are planted in raised beds (2 ft deep), have red mulch on them, are watered daily, and fertilized with one that contains calcium. Any suggestions?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
June 25, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

In addition to the high temps, it sounds like you may have too much nitrogen in the soil. High nitrogen will encourage foliage growth and discourage blooming and fruiting. Add some phosphorus to the soil to combat this. Bone meal is a good source of this. Here is more information: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/phosphorus-plant-growth.htm

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