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Top Questions About Bell Pepper Plants

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Questions About Bell Pepper Plants

  • Answered by
    Heather on
    April 17, 2011
    Certified Expert
    A.

    If you live in an area where you have a full growing season ahead of you, there is no problem with planting the seeds now.

    If you do not have a full growing season ahead right now, you can store the seeds for the next growing season by placing them in a paper envelop, which can be placed in a plastic bag or tupperware container and then this can be placed in the veggie drawer of your fridge. You can store them this way until you are ready to plant and pepper seeds remain viable for many years when stored this way.

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  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    April 21, 2011
    Certified Expert
    A.

    No, they are considered annual plants and will not return season after season.

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  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    April 21, 2011
    Certified Expert
    A.

    While it is oftentimes a good idea to allow seeds to dry beforehand, you don't need to dry the seeds to grow them. You really only need to dry them if you plan on storing them. You can plant them as soon as they come out of the pepper.

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  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    April 26, 2011
    Certified Expert
  • Answered by
    Heather on
    May 9, 2011
    Certified Expert
    A.

    They may have wilt. Peppers are susceptible to the same wilts that tomatoes get. This article will have more about them:
    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomato/wilting-tomato-plants.htm

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  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    May 3, 2011
    Certified Expert
    A.

    While generally considered perennials (with overwintering in cold regions), bell peppers are generally grown and treated as annuals. In warmer locations that are frost free, it is possible, wtih pruning, to extend their lifespan, though doing so doesn't offer any special rewards. Generally, after 6 months, the plants begin to look ragged.

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  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    May 4, 2011
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Normally when you see lots of foliage and little flowers/fruit, this is an indicator of too much nitrogen and too little phosphorus. Use bone meal to add phosphorus. That should fix it. This article has other information:
    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/phosphorus-plant-growth.htm

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