Top Questions About Anthurium Plants

Click on links below to jump to that question.

Questions About Anthurium Plants

Asked by
Anonymous on
January 3, 2011

Q. Anthurium Care

I have planted Anthuriums in a plot of 12 feet by 8 feet – about 12 of them. These were transferred from pots. Is the area too big for the plants? Should I put them back into the pots and bury them in the plot? The place is facing north, and is covered both on east and west, so no direct sunlight.

Answered by
Nikki on
January 3, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

This area is just fine for the plants. They do not need to be in pots if you are planning on keeping them in the ground.

00
Was this answer useful?
Join Us - Sign up to get all the latest gardening tips!
Asked by
Anonymous on
April 20, 2011

Q. Plants and Frost

I need to know if some plants have to be protected against cold. The Anthurium and the pony tail, for instance. I don’t know the botanic names. Is there a list of plants that need protection against frost available?

Answered by
Nikki on
April 21, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

Unfortunately there is no complete list of plants that need frost protection. Your best bet would be to type in the plant's name into Google followed by the word zone or hardiness and this will bring up results that let you know how much cold the plant can tolerate.

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
bigmike57 on
October 2, 2011

Q. Why My Anthurium Will Not Bloom

Why will my anthurium plant not bloom?

Answered by
Heather on
October 2, 2011
Certified Expert
Asked by
pamsopko on
May 3, 2012

Q. how can I save my anthurium?

I purchased an Anthurium last fall, which was doing fine til recently. . . noticed the leaves had brown through them and today several are shriveled and drying. The plant came already growing on a piece of lava, so I put it on a bed of decorative pebbles which sat in a bowl of water. The roots seemed to grow down into the water which I kept filled so it wouldn’t dry out.

Answered by
Heather on
May 7, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

Have you fertilized it at all. They need only a very light fertilizer high in phosphorous, but if you have not given any fertilizer, it may need a little to help it.

It sounds like you are growing it in an almost water based medium, so try giving it just a little fertilizer once every other month so it can get the nutrients it would normally get from soil.

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
knysnasandy on
May 18, 2012

Q. Help…Can I save my anthurium?

I’ve over-watered my anthurium and the lovely plant is drooping more by the minute. I’ve taken it out of the potting medium and left the roots to dry out a bit but the poor special baby is looking like death. Please help if you can.

Answered by
Nikki on
May 19, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

If it has not developed root rot as a result of the overwatering, you can cut back watering and the plant will most likely recover. If it has root rot, you may be best getting a new plant. At any rate, this article will help with root rot: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/disease/treating-root-rot-gardening-tips-for-housplants.htm

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
HSGmembergrenada on
October 14, 2012

Q. My White Anthuriums Are Turning Green, Should I Cut Them Off ?

My white anthuriums are turning green. Should I cut them off? The red withers and dies but the white gets as green as a leaf and becomes hard.

Answered by
Nikki on
October 15, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

Yes, you can try cutting these to prevent entire reversion of the plant. This article will help explain why this reversion occurs: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/variegated-plant-problems.htm

00
Was this answer useful?
Asked by
shijith_bala on
November 22, 2012

Q. How Can I Plant New Anthurium From My Existing One

Details about planting a new anthurium from existing one.

Answered by
AnnsGreeneHaus on
November 22, 2012
A.

"...wait until the stem of the anthurium has grown up to 50cm or more in height and then take a top cutting, by slicing the woody stem of your plant at a length a little more than half of its height. This will encourage the lower portion to produce new off-shoots or runners. Plant the top cutting in potting mix or soil which drains well and keep looking after the parent plant. Ultimately the parent plant will develop new foliage along with the new top cutting. On the parent, any stem node or off-shoot with aerial roots or any slight indication of them is an ideal candidate for new growth, which can be further cut out and divided. "
The above was taken from this article: http://www.baliadvertiser.biz/articles/garden_doctor/2011/anthurium.html

00
Was this answer useful?
1 2 3 11
Learn

Learn From
Your Peers on
Our Blog

Visit Our Blog
The website that started it all!
Main Website

Do you know a lot about gardening?
Become a GKH Gardening Expert

Learn More