Eucalyptus Tree
Q.

Silver Princess Dying

Zone 6053 | BecT added on February 15, 2020 | Answered

Last year I planted a Silver Princess. It absolutely thrived, then suddenly died a year later. It had borers so I treated the soil with bug crystals from the nursery & later replanted another Silver Princess in the same spot. The same thing has just happened. At the same time & height. No sign of borers, but the new growth on the very healthy tree suddenly wilted & the next day all the leaves were dead. Seemingly within 48 hours. We live in Perth WA & it’s been very hot, but all other plants around the Silver Princess are fine. I did notice a root sticking up out of the soil yesterday which I have since covered over. Thank you for any advice you can offer!

A.
A.Answers to this queston: Add Answer
BushDoctor
Certified GKH Gardening Expert
Answered on February 18, 2020

Transplanting in the heat seems to be the culprit. Here in the US, we recommend planting during Spring or Autumn to avoid transplant shock.

In your area, you will have to wait until the temperature is mild and the ground is able to stay moist but not saturated.

It would be best to, also, test the soil for deficiencies, or pH swings.

These articles will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/testing-soil.htm

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/soil-ph-plants.htm

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/organic/the-importance-of-soil-for-an-organic-garden.htm

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/learn-how-to-avoid-and-repair-transplant-shock-in-plants.htm

10
Was this answer useful?

BecT
Answered on February 21, 2020

Thank you so much for taking the time to answer BushDoctor, much appreciated. I planted the tree a while back when it was cool so transplanting in the heat isn’t the issue in this instance, however you were bang on about the PH levels. In between the tree & the lime footings of our house they are sky high! The soil PH in the rest of the garden is absolutely fine, so the local nursery is thinking that perhaps when the tree gets to a certain size its roots reach the limestone & burn. The tree is still alive so we’re trying sulphur in that area of soil & Seasol & soil wetter on the plant base in the hope that the roots that head away from the house take hold & the plants recovers in the coming months. Fingers crossed! Thanks again for your advice, cheers

00
Was this answer useful?

Log in or sign up to help answer this question.
Did you find this helpful? Share it with your friends!

You must be logged into your account to answer a question.

If you don't have an account sign up for an account now.

Looking for more?
here are more questions about...
Eucalyptus Tree
Join Us - Sign up to get all the latest gardening tips!
Learn

Learn From
Your Peers on
Our Blog

Visit Our Blog

Do you know a lot about gardening?
Become a GKH Gardening Expert

Learn More