Top Questions About Tetradium

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Questions About Tetradium

Asked by
Kathleen Leitner on
July 23, 2017
Chatham NY 12037

Q. planting Bee Bee Tree fall or spring

we raise bees, we have 160 acres of farm land, mostly pasture. zone 5.

we would like to plant in a location full sun.

we would like to plant a larger tree closer to blooming stage. should we plant in fall or spring?

Thank you, Kathleen Leitner, Camphill Ghent 2542 rte 66, Chatham NY 12037

Answered by
MichiganDot on
July 23, 2017
A.

With a larger tree, I'd go with fall. Even after leaf drop, the roots keep working and will be better able to withstand next year's summer if given a fall head start. Of course, regular watering the first year is important. And I'd resist the temptation to fertilize the first year as well unless a soil test shows deficiencies.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
April 9, 2019

Q. Bee Bee trees

Do I need too plant both male and female trees in order to get blooms?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
April 9, 2019
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Asked by
Anonymous on
July 1, 2019

Q. Problems with Evodia daniellii

Good morning, I wonder if you can help me please.
I bought and planted a young Evodia Danielle, about 1.2m tall & with no leaves at the time, in March/ April.
It has done very well so far with 8-10 new leaves which have looked very healthy until the last week or so. The new leaves and small branches have now wilted/drooped, the leaves are curling upwards and turning slightly brown.
I live in Le Marche Italy – we have had a lot of rain since April, our soil is clay.
Could the tree have been over watered/waterlogged ? The ground now is drying out nicely but the tree does not look very healthy at all.
Do you have any thoughts or advice please ?
Thank you for your help,

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
July 1, 2019
A.

This shrub prefers well drained soil, so these issues following heavy rains and clay soil are the likely reason for the symptoms you describe.

If the problem is minor, mix compost into the top 8 to 10 inches of soil to add a surge of nutrients.
Add earthworms! Worms eat through compacted soil, helping restore a healthy flow of air and water.
If the problem seems more serious (and you may need an arborist to confirm that), try aerating. By drilling holes into the soil, you break up those compressed particles and provide more air. So, your tree will be able to breathe easier and have better access to nutrients.
Avoid drilling through roots.

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