Succulent Plants

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  1. wintering succulent
  2. Black Rose Succulent
  3. Plants That Don’t Like Rain
  4. It is about Jacobsen hanging succulent plants
  5. Hose Sprayer for Weed Killing
  6. Succulent Indoor Lighting..
  7. What are flat, whitish spots and brownish, slightly raised spots appearing on succulents and cactus
Asked by rebjaynes on December 3, 2010
Wintering Succulent

My flowering succulent (in a pot) wilted with a light freeze outdoors, can I save it?

ANSWERS
Heather
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

As long as some part of it is still alive, it can regrow, but be aware that it will look rather shabby for quite some time as it recovers. Sometimes it is just easier to throw the plant out and replace it. Consider how much effort you want to invest.

To see if your succulent is still alive, check the leaves closest to the center. They will have some "bite" or snap if still alive. Think al dente pasta (but don't eat it, just bend the leaf ;) ). If they are dead, they will be flopy soft. If they are soft, check the base. Same thing. give it a squeeze and it should feel like the base is firm, not soft.

As long as some part is firm, the plant is alive and can make a recovery, with proper care. The biggest mistake people make with succulents is overcare, which will kill a damaged succulent. Water it properly (when the soil is dry) and keep it in good light. Keep an eye on the weather and do not let it get exposed to sub-freezing weather again.

Good luck with your plant!

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Asked by Anonymous on May 25, 2011
Black Rose Succulent

I purchased 2-4 year old black rose succulent plants from the nursery and was told not to over water the plants and they would be fine in a shaded area. I watered the plants once per week. About three weeks ago, I noticed the plants losing their leaves, then the leaves started to droop. I extended the waterings to every 10 days. Now the stems are turning green below the flower itself and the leaves are completely wilty and droopy. I moved the plants to full sun three days ago. What am I doing wrong? Live in Phoenix, AZ.

ANSWERS
Nikki
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

I would increase watering a bit until the plants are established. They need some time to adjust to their new home and get settled and need additional water during this time.

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Asked by deb57 on October 5, 2011
Plants That Don’t Like Rain

Hi. I have a variety of plants and succulents. Also, tomatoes, bell peppers and strawberries which I’m growing outdoors in containers. How can I find out which ones don’t like rain? I live in Sacramento, Ca.

ANSWERS
Heather
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

Typically, plants that do not like much water will be fleshy (like succulents) or will have a thick feel to the foliage.

Almost all vegetable and fruit plants need lots of water, so you can take those right off the list.

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Asked by tfiorentini on March 31, 2012
It Is About Jacobsen Hanging Succulent Plants

Yesterday I saw two plants and I thought that they would look nice in two urns in front of my house where they would get full sun and the deer could approach them.  Would this be a good place for them? The plants were beautiful and would cascade over the urns.

ANSWERS
Heather
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

I am not familiar with this specific plant, but most succulents do like full sun and heat and are drought tolerant so I would suspect that this plant would do well in a container in the location you describe.

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Asked by Ms T on September 27, 2012
Hose Sprayer for Weed Killing

I want to use a hose type sprayer, a sprayer attached to a hose to kill the weeds in my garden, but I don’t want to kill my plants. I have succulents, roses, cacti, garden flowers. What can I use?

ANSWERS
Heather
Certified GKH Gardening Expert

You can try making a cover for the nozzle. A cheap one can be made from a 2 liter bottle. Just cut off the bottom and put the nozzle through the top. Then you can set the cone over the weed and spray. The cone will protect your other plants from herbicide overspray.

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Asked by garygreen on November 20, 2012
Succulent Indoor Lighting..

I have read that Metal Halide and or High Pressure Sodium lights will benefit the needs of succulents. Looking at the 400 watt MH or HPS light fixtures, I see they are sold with both HP and HPS bulbs.
Question is – Do growers that use MH or HPS simply change the bulbs in the fixture and, if so, how often and when? Is their anyone out there using this lighting? Thank you.

ANSWERS
theficuswrangler

Many people recommend using cool white fluorescent alone, or with a small incandescent. I think "grow lights" of many sorts do more for the manufacturers' pockets than for the plants. Of course, you can experiment all you want, remembering that different varieties of succulents have different light needs. Some people are beginning to use LED lights also - happy researching. Try to match your particular specie light requirements with light output of type of bulb.

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AnnsGreeneHaus

I had success using regular cool white and warm white flourescent bulbs, one each in a two bulb fixture. The plants were 8" - 18" from the bulbs, depending on their needs.

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Asked by Garden Nut on October 18, 2013
What Are Flat, Whitish Spots and Brownish, Slightly Raised Spots Appearing on Succulents and Cactus

White spots on some succulents and brown slightly raised spots on others. I cannot see any insect that might be making them. Are the plants diseased? How to cure?

ANSWERS
AnnsGreeneHaus

It sounds like scale. This article should help identify: http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/scale-bug-how-to-control-plant-scale.htm

In addition to insecticides, both systemic and contact, I've used water pressure to help control scale. If the skin of the cactus or succulent is reasonably tough, I've applied water through a shut-off valve that knocks the scale from the plant. Be careful that the stream of water isn't so hard that it damages the plant. After getting scale from the plant, I usually use both contact and systemic insecticides. In the case of scale, my theory is, "Either kill the scale or kill the plant." Sometimes, if the infestation isn't too large, a toothbrush works well. And, remember, there are several varieties of scale. Color can indicate variety or maturity of insect.

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