Top Questions About Shrubs And Trees

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Questions About Shrubs And Trees

Asked by
Anonymous on
September 27, 2015

Q. moving established shrubs and trees

I’ve sold part of my large garden but want to retain favorite shrubs and small trees and move them to another part of the garden. When is the best time to do this please and what’s the best way? Thank you.

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
September 28, 2015
Certified Expert
A.

Spring and early fall are the best times to move plants. The key is to do your best to keep the plants from going into shock. This article will help you with that:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/environmental/learn-how-to-avoid-and-repair-transplant-shock-in-plants.htm

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Asked by
ruthandcharles45 on
May 17, 2018

Q. Hedges

These hedges look damaged due to a harsh winter. Are they worth the trouble to try and save them? And what do we do to save them?

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
May 18, 2018
Certified Expert
A.

We did not receive an image.

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Asked by
Judith_turner1 on
May 19, 2018

Q. New hedge

Our new hedge has made an excellent start this spring but now a few of the older leaves are going yellow what can we do?

Answered by
BushDoctor on
May 19, 2018
Certified Expert
A.

This can be a few different issues, depending on the species of shrub that it is. Some plants show this as a deficiency of calcium or magnesium, although it can be an iron deficiency in some species. If you can provide the plant name, I will be more than glad to help.

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Asked by
Mikejh2323 on
May 28, 2018

Q. Pic on your website

You have a picture of this on your website. I am looking for small shrubs that can be pruned to look like trees. Can you help!

http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/tree-jasmine.jpg

Thank you!
Mike Hadden
mikejh2323@gmail.com

Answered by
BushDoctor on
May 29, 2018
Certified Expert
A.

You can do this with almost any shrub. It just takes careful planning, and a thorough knowledge of exactly how plants will grow. You will want to trim all but one main leader, and then prune where you want the first split. After you will be maintaining where branching splits occur. You will then keep any growth below your original split trimmed off. This will be a constant process.

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Asked by
Greg666 on
June 10, 2018

Q. Hedge advise

Hello,

I need some advise how to change my hedge to it’s old glory.

Image attached

Thankful for every advise

Cheers
-Greg

Answered by
Downtoearthdigs on
June 11, 2018
Certified Expert
A.

From this image it appears you have large die back of your English Ivy.
Dieback could be due to age, pests or disease. Is this growing on a wall or structure of some type?
More information or inspection will be needed to rule out these issues.
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/groundcover/english-ivy/english-ivy-pruning-tips.htm
When an ivy plant becomes large and overgrown, it is possible to remove the older vines and rejuvenate the plant with new growth. Severe pruning in the late winter or early spring allows you to see and remove the most aggressive vines and encourage new, controllable growth. Cut stems back to a more manageable size and pull out the excess vines. Leaving at least 18 inches on each healthy vine gives them plenty of encouragement and room to grow.

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Asked by
jcfritsche on
June 18, 2018

Q. Tall tree needs to be shorned as now handicapped

Tree is great but 12 feet tall and I can no longer use a pole cutter. Want to reduce height to 8 feet or so friends can cut oranges for me with the least work by them.

Thanks for any ideas of how to go about this.

John Fritsche

Answered by
drtreelove on
June 18, 2018
Certified Expert
A.

I discourage you from doing the extreme topping like you are suggesting. It can be detrimental and expose the stems to sunburn and decay.
There are long handled fruit pickers available. Or hire a neighbor kid to climb and pick the fruit for you.
If you are set on the radical crown reduction, it would be best to hire a professional arborist to do selective reduction prunin. It's impossible to teach it in a text message like this.

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