Top Questions About Poppy Flowers

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Questions About Poppy Flowers

Asked by
nancytrackwell on
July 19, 2011

Q. Insect eating plants

I have poppies, green beans and petunias that are being eaten by an insect. What can I use to save my plants and not hurt the animals?

Answered by
Susan75023 on
July 20, 2011
A.

Look closely at the plants and see if you can find insects. If not, it is probably grasshoppers. They come and go leaving their damage. I don't use pesticides so have learned to think leaves with holes in them are pretty. :-} I handpick larger insects actually on plants and squish their eggs. I want butterflies and bees so am willing to do this.

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Asked by
SUSANMUMMYSUE on
June 24, 2012

Q. I bought 3 oriental poppy plants 2 years ago

It is only this year that I have one nice bud, but it dosen’t look as though it is going to open. Should I give it a helping hand?

Answered by
Nikki on
June 25, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

You may be lacking phosphorus in the soil, which is necessary for blooming. Give the plants some phosphorus-rich fertilizer or add some bone meal to the soil around them and this should improve the flowering.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
July 23, 2012

Q. Island Poppy Best Zone for Growing

I live near Half Moon Bay and think I live in Zone 10. Is the native plant, the yellow flowering Island Poppy, a plant I should expect to do well in my area, or in another area?

Answered by
Nikki on
July 24, 2012
Certified Expert
A.

Yes, this plant is hardy in zones 8-10.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
November 18, 2012

Q. Planting Poppies for Seed Production

I would be interested in knowing when we can plant some poppy seeds that we acquired from someone in northern Maine. We will be planting them in the coastal range mountains in California between San Jose and Salinas California.

Answered by
Nikki on
November 19, 2012
Certified Expert
Asked by
Anonymous on
May 25, 2014

Q. Poppy Pest That Cuts Off Buds

My poppy plant had 12 or 13 buds on the point of blooming. Overnight 6 of their stems have been cut nearly through so that the buds are hanging from a thread. Could this be cutworms? What do they get out of it? They don’t seem to be eating any part of it. How can I control them, preferably without poison?

Answered by
Nikki on
May 25, 2014
Certified Expert
A.

It certainly sounds like cutworms and this article will help: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/insects/get-rid-cutworms.htm

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Asked by
mrendulic on
August 10, 2014

Q. poppy

When is the best time to plant poppy seeds? I was told to plant in the fall. I tried but nothing came up! I planted in the spring and the plants were so small with no flowers.

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
August 11, 2014
A.

Your going to want to plant seeds in the spring. Poppies are tough once they get going - my mother had a patch beside the driveway that bloomed year after year with absolutely no care - but the sowing of the seeds has to be done in a rather exact way. This article should help you out. https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/flowers/poppy/growing-oriental-poppies.htm

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Asked by
Andy Franko on
September 15, 2014

Q. Weeds totally overcame my wildflowers

Working through a local landscaper we put in a 1/4 acre wild flower garden. The first year we have wonderful poppies, and then some wildflowers into mid summer. The second year we had grasses and weeds taking over, and the third year, even though the landscaper sprayed Round-up 3 times after letting things sprout in the fall and very early spring, the weeds have totally over run the wildflowers. Should we roto-till and rake off roots perhaps? Should we put in top soil? Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Answered by
theficuswrangler on
September 16, 2014
A.

A wild flower garden, by definition, is composed of flowers that grow wild in your area - in other words, they are...weeds! Wild flower gardening is gardening in which you let things do what they do, rather than trying to force a preconceived design. This article might give you some more ideas: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/spaces/a-wildflower-garden-in-your-backyard.htm

I think I would not use herbicide, because it's probably killing as many of your wild flowers as it kills weeds. Rather, simply pull out some weeds and plant more seeds. If you keep trying different seed mixtures, eventually you'll find those that do well in your spot, and can coexist with the other weeds. You might also try to find someone who's more of a specialist in wildflower plantings; you can also access the county extension service to see what advice they have. This link will help you locate the nearest one:
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/info/what-is-extension-service.htm

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