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  • Answered by
    theficuswrangler on
    March 28, 2014
    A.

    Go ahead and cut off the spent flower stalk where it emerges from the main stem. And congratulations, you must have a healthy and happy plant if it flowered for you.

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  • Answered by
    theficuswrangler on
    June 19, 2014
    A.

    If you mean the Beaucarnea recurvata, often called the ponytail palm, yes indeed they do flower. I'm guessing you have it outdoors, because if it's indoors and has decided to flower, you get a blue ribbon -- very unusual thing to see. Here's an article with some more information: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/ponytail-palm/ponytail-palm-care.htm

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  • Answered by
    theficuswrangler on
    July 2, 2014
    A.

    The soil is probably too wet. Ponytails don't like to sit in damp soil at all. If you have it in low light, get it into higher light right away -- just not direct sun. Try putting it where a fan can blow on it gently. The purpose is to dry it out as quickly as possible. You might even try removing it from its pot, setting the rootball on some newspapers or paper towels, and leaving it like that for a few days. In the future, don't water it until the soil in the bottom of the pot is almost dry. Use some kind of tester, like a moisture meter or a pencil you can stick in then feel for moisture. If it gets a little too dry, no harm done. The swollen base is a water storage facility.

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  • Answered by
    theficuswrangler on
    September 21, 2014
    A.

    You can cut off dead leaves (leaves that are completely yellow or brown) at the spot where they emerge from the stem. If your plant is in a pot, you will need to be careful not to use too much water. Ponytails need to get almost dry all the way to the bottom of the pot. This article will help you:https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/testing-moisture-in-plants.htm
    If your plant is outdoors (I think South Africa is warm enough for these to grow outside) you don't need to worry about watering it at all, after the first couple of months. These articles will tell you more about the charming ponytail palm: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/ponytail-palm/

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  • Answered by
    Nikki on
    October 7, 2014
    Certified Expert
    A.

    Yes, it is fine to leave your ponytail palm outdoors in your zone. These plants are hardy in zone 9-12, so yours should do well without any special care. Plant in spring in full sun to part shade in well draining soil. The initial care should be the same as those grown inside: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/ponytail-palm/ponytail-palm-care.htm

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  • Answered by
    theficuswrangler on
    November 24, 2014
    A.

    You don't need to do anything special. Just maintain good watering and light, and the ponytail should sprout some new heads just below the broken spot.

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