What's your question? Ask

Top Questions About Hydrangea Plants

Click on links below to jump to that question.

Questions About Hydrangea Plants

  • Answered by
    GKH_Susan on
    March 30, 2024
    Certified Expert
    A.

    You could do the rejuvenation pruning and cut them to the ground. If those hydrangeas bloom on old wood, you won't get blooms this year. Skip the fertilizer so they can recover. Hydrangeas need little to no fertilizer.

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/shgen/rejuvenation-pruning-tips.htm

    Was this answer useful?
    00
Join Us - Sign up to get all the latest gardening tips!
  • Answered by
    GKH_Susan on
    April 24, 2024
    Certified Expert
    Was this answer useful?
    00
  • Answered by
    luis_pr on
    April 23, 2024
    A.

    Maybe. Some formulations of Miracle Gro contain excessive levels of nitrogen. A better choice may be any general purpose, slow release fertilizer with a NPK ratio of around 10-10-10. Holly-tone is fine but apply it by your average date of last frost at full strength and then again, at half strength, 3 months before your average date is first frost.

    Was this answer useful?
    00
  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    May 13, 2024
    Certified Expert
    A.

    This is usually caused by a few things, but I think that two of them may be the cause.

    Too much nitrogen and not enough phosphorous and potassium would be a reason for a lack of flowers. It would produce vigorous green growth, but will throw off the balance of flowering nutrients.

    Pruning can be another factor. Some of those vines that stray away from the main plant can sap energy that would be used, otherwise, for flowering. They take quite awhile to reach full maturity in size, but should be showing more flowering than that, even, near maturity.

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/vines/climbing-hydrangea/growing-climbing-hydrangeas.htm

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/vines/climbing-hydrangea/climbing-hydrangea-wont-bloom.htm

    Was this answer useful?
    00
  • Answered by
    luis_pr on
    May 13, 2024
    A.

    Patience. Like other vines like wisteria, Hydrangea anómala sap. petiolaris can typically require about 10 years to bloom. This is a large vine that can exceed 80 feet so be ready to root prune periodically to keep it in containers.

    Was this answer useful?
    00
  • Answered by
    GKH_Susan on
    May 22, 2024
    Certified Expert
  • Answered by
    luis_pr on
    May 29, 2024
    A.

    It depends. This species of hydrangeas breaks dormancy first by only growing new stems from the crown/base of the stems. About 1-2 months later, the leafless live stems break dormancy separately and leaf out. Because the leaf out time can be quite late in some years, consider not pruning the leafless stems until the end of June in Ohio. If you prematurely prune, you may be reducing or eliminating the spring blooms. However, the second flush occurs in the summer/fall once the new stems that started growing in spring 2024 attain sufficient height to trigger flower bud set and immediate blooming. Dormant flower buds begin to develop inside stem endings close to the time that the last flower bud of each flush opens.

    Was this answer useful?
    00
  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    June 3, 2024
    Certified Expert
    A.

    I'm seeing signs of disease in the Mahonia, as well. Bacterial or fungal diseases are common in wet soils, and they can be hard to identify by pictures. The best way to identify the exact issue will be your local agricultural extension service.

    In the meantime, treatment will focus on maintaining the disease. Fungicides and good sanitary practice will be your best bet. This means keeping any dead or dying debris pruned away and removed from the area.

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/info/using-fungicides-in-garden.htm

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/hydrangea/growing-hydrangeas-hydrangea-care-guide.htm

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/mahonia/growing-leatherleaf-mahonia.htm

    Was this answer useful?
    00
  • Answered by
    BushDoctor on
    June 7, 2024
    Certified Expert
    A.

    This is not true for every situation. They are picky bloomers. Aluminum sulfate is usually only used to adjust pH and influencing the bloom color. In most cases, this is not a preferred way to lower the pH since it stays around in soil for a very long time, and becomes toxic. Sometimes this goes to the point of halting all growth, though is takes quite a long time.

    I would say that the pH of the soil was not where it should have been, or that there was an excess of unavailable nitrogen and bound up phosphorus. Another thing to consider about phosphorus interaction with aluminum sulfate would be that, eventually, it binds out phosphorus. This makes it unavailable.

    Every situation is different, so it is best to always test your soil before doing anything to it. This will tell you exactly what the soil needs or doesn't need.

    Your local extension service can help with more accurate results than home tests.

    https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/info/what-is-extension-service.htm

    Was this answer useful?
    00
1 114 115 116 117

Do you know a lot about gardening?
Become a GKH Gardening Expert

OK