Top Questions About Hosta Plant

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Questions About Hosta Plant

Asked by
Anonymous on
May 14, 2011

Q. Planting After Weeding

I want to end the vicious cycle of weeding by filling in my previously-spacious garden with hostas and ‘step-ables. ‘ I am unsure what to do now that I have pulled all of the weeds (again!) and want to plant the new plants. I was thinking about digging 3-4 inches of the soil throughout the garden, leaving the current plants in place, putting down newspaper, planting the new plants, and putting the soil back but it’s going to have all the weed-remnants and seeds in it. If I treat the soil for weeds, how long do I wait before I plant the new plants? How do I make sure it doesn’t hurt the current plants? How do I prevent weeds from coming back while the new plants grow and fill in the spaces?

Answered by
Nikki on
May 15, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

You are definitely on the right track. Here is my suggestion: Leave the soil, if feasible. Lay wet newspaper six to ten layers thick throughout the area and around your plants. Make sure you overlap the edges by at least six inches to kill any weed seeds that may be present from trying to pop through. Add about six inches of compost or rich soil on top. Put your new plants in this and fill in around your current ones. Top it off with a layer of organic mulch.

If you really feel the need to treat the soil, here is an article that you may find helpful: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/how-long-does-weed-killer-last-in-the-soil.htm

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Asked by
aggie1 on
May 22, 2011

Q. Can You Grow Hostas in Mesa, Az.

Don’t know where to find hostas in Az.

Answered by
Heather on
May 26, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

They should grow there. They are resilient plant. If you cannot find them in garden centers, ask around. If you find someone who has one, they might be willing to share. They are easy to divide and will rapidly fill back in.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 11, 2011

Q. Hostas

My big beautiful hosta plants are rotting from the bottom leaves up. What causes this?

Answered by
Nikki on
June 12, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

It may have crown rot. Here is more information on this:
https://www.extension.iastate.edu/publications/sul8.pdf

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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 19, 2011

Q. Hostas Yellowing and Dying

Why do my hostas’ plant leaves turn yellow/brown and die?

Answered by
Nikki on
June 20, 2011
Certified Expert
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Asked by
deboraht01 on
June 20, 2011

Q. Dividing Hostas

With only one day till summer, is it safe to divide Hostas now?

Answered by
Nikki on
June 20, 2011
Certified Expert
A.

You can normally divide these plants anytime from spring through fall. However, it really depends on how hot it is in your area. As long as you can ensure that they'll get adequate water and give them some shade, you can probably go ahead and divide them now though.

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Asked by
Anonymous on
June 21, 2011

Q. Newly Planted Hosta Garden

Planted a hosta garden around an old maple tree. Put down newspaper over grass, as digging was not an option, then filled with new black soil. All has been well until this week (about a month in) and now have white circles about 8 inches in diameter evenly spaced through garden that looks like frost patches that can be brushed away.
Any ideas on what this is and what to do about it?

Answered by
Nikki on
June 22, 2011
Certified Expert
Asked by
Lynn on
July 17, 2011

Q. Hosta Leaves Breaking Off at Ground Level

I have a small shade garden with many hostas. One particular part of the garden has the hosta plants being broken off at ground level. I look in the morning and more stems are broken and lying on the ground. It looks as though something is digging small holes in the earth near the plant, but I don’t know if it’s the pesky squirrels or some other critter, or if that has anything to do with the problem. I’ve had this garden for 20 years with never a problem!

Answered by
Susan75023 on
July 19, 2011
A.

I have a similar experience here in Dallas. Does the hole lead to a tunnel or is it just surface soil movement? If a tunnel, could be voles. If just a small area dug out, I am suspect of rabbits. I have one that is caught in the back yard and althought he is small, he is growing. He prefers certain varieties - I guess they are the gourmet choice. Are the leaves being eaten? Or just broken off. Squirrels would probably not eat leaves but could be burying winter food and disturbing plants. Guess you could dig a little in the hole and see if anything is buried. I don't think I am helping much - am sympathetic, however.

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